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Opinion

  • Spencer County Sheriff Buddy Stump ran on promises of providing 24/7 coverage to Spencer Countians and lately, there’s little evidence of that commitment being fulfilled.

    A string of high-profile incidents ranging from a home invasion to a fatal accident have been outsourced to state police. Most recently, Sunday afternoon’s murder in the county saw response from both city and state police, but no one from the Sheriff’s Office was on the scene.

  • Masterminds of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) intended by choosing to establish School-Based Decision Making (SBDM) councils as schools’ governing bodies to deal with nepotism primarily in rural areas.

    Such favoritism did result in abuse of power, often in smaller districts which some superintendents treated as their own personal freedoms by hiring family members and doling out jobs as a form of political patronage.

  • In 2005, legislation was enacted by the United States Congress to beef up national security by adding new requirements for state driver’s licenses and other official ID cards. Ever since then, as states have gone through the process of complying with the new mandates, much opposition has formed to what is often called REAL ID.  However, despite those concerns, the new ID cards will give every Kentuckian the option to obtain a federally approved ID and lift the burden on things like flying and entering military installments.

  • There’s no doubt we live in troubled times. The world seems to be teetering on the edge of major conflicts, our nation is more divided than ever, and even locally, people often find themselves opposing their neighbors over issues.

  • Getting rid of an unbalanced reliance on the income tax and moving to an approach that taxes consumption instead would brand Kentucky a state of producers rather than a commonwealth of punishers.

    After all, what do personal and corporate income taxes accomplish other than funding government services and programs by punishing – and thus discouraging – individuals from producing and businesses from growing?

    A proven free-market principle is: policies get more of what they encourage and less of what is discouraged.

  • Each year over 28,000 children experience abuse and neglect in Kentucky. To paint a picture of the need, the average Kentucky elementary school has 500 students. The 28,000 abused and neglected children could fill 56 elementary schools. This number includes 69 children in Spencer County.

  • Elected officials are given enormous responsibilities by those who elect them. Perhaps the most important is to remember that they serve the public and are accountable to the taxpayer.

    For that reason, elected officials must be transparent, especially when it comes to the use of taxpayer dollars and equipment, supplies and materials purchased with those tax dollars.

  • The most productive and significant legislative session in modern history has officially come to an end. Although it was a short, 30-day session, the General Assembly has accomplished more in 2017 than we have in most 60-day sessions.

  • Long nights, intense debate, and media attention from across the globe wrapped up what started as a quiet final week of the 2017 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. Minutes before the Senate gaveled out for good, Governor Matt Bevin called this session the most productive in history.  It was truly an honor to work alongside the governor with the new House Majority to pass many great initiatives for our commonwealth.

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month and it is a sad commentary on our society when we need a public awareness campaign to remind us how we should care for the most vulnerable among us.

    Last year in Spencer County, officials investigated over 170 reports of child abuse, involving nearly 250 children.

    Child abuse and neglect is not limited to one neighborhood, or social-economic class. It happens across the county, meaning that one of these children who are hurting, hungry, cold or mistreated, may live across the street or down the road from you.

  • Shame on you John Riley.

    You defeated me two plus years ago in the judge’s general election and I am certainly not a “sore or poor loser.” To the contrary, I am free for the first time in my life.

    As a fulfilled person, I will devote the remainder of my life preparing for the hereafter and being with family.

  • I’ve always loved history, especially Kentucky history. I can’t recall if Mr. Larry Dixon, my 7th grade history teacher at Belmont Junior High School in Winchester, was a highly skilled communicator or not, but something about that unit on Kentucky History grabbed my attention and never let me go.

    So while compiling this larger than usual issue of The Spencer Magnet has been a busy one for us here at the office, it’s been fascinating for me as well as I was able to do a little research into the 150-year history of this publication.

  • Do you know a chronic fake news perpetuator? Mine is my cousin on Facebook. He spreads fake news like it’s his job. He reacts to each sensational headline with the correct amount of outrage. I don’t think it’s intentional. I think he sees someone else sharing these, he believes them to be true, and he clicks share. It is not a problem of malice; it is a problem of media literacy.

  • The Spencer County Parks and Recreation would like to thank all the participants in the Spencer County Youth Basketball League.

    Thanks to the parents and coaches – we couldn’t have done it without you.

    I would also like to thank the Spencer County Fiscal Court, the Spencer County Board of Education and those in maintenance at the schools – Joe Oliver, Dee Oliver, Jenny Nation and Mike and Rodney.

  • On March 15th, Kentucky legislators voted in favor of charter schools being allowed to infiltrate our state. We could start seeing charter schools being built as early as the next school year.

    Do not be misled or fooled. This was not just a bill for Louisville and Lexington. Rural areas such as Spencer County are at risk of having these schools invade our county.

  • The great divide in America was on full display in Louisville Monday night as President Donald J. Trump held a rally at Freedom Hall that drew a packed house of over 20,000.

    The event also drew large crowds of protesters who set up their protest lines nearby with signs and posters as they planned an inhospitable welcome to both the President and those who support him.

  • Each of us had a school teacher who we still remember today. That teacher may have spent extra time helping us hone a skill we needed a little more time to learn. Or maybe he or she was a listening ear when we couldn’t find one anywhere else.

  • Early mornings turned to late nights and spirited debate echoed through the House and Senate chambers as we closed in on the final days of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. A flurry of bills were sent to Governor Matt Bevin’s desk this week, highlighted by measures to empower our Kentucky teachers and create better learning environments for our Kentucky students.

  • On March 7, the Kentucky House of Representatives passed House Bill 58, informally dubbed the ‘Tim Tebow’ bill. If signed into law, House Bill 58 would allow homeschool students to participate in public school extracurricular activities for the school in their respective district.

  • This is a copy of a message I sent to Judge Riley and all of the Spencer County magistrates who have public email addresses.  (Squire Rogers has no email address available.  Do you, my fellow citizens, agree or disagree?  

    Either way, let your voices be heard by contacting your magistrates or judge, or by attending a fiscal court meeting.

    Here is my opinion on various issues facing the county: