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Opinion

  • Being a state that is closely tied to the horse racing industry, it’s not a surprise that expanded gambling is frequently discussed in Kentucky. Even more, it’s no surprise this issue comes up when the woes of Kentucky’s economy are mentioned. Keeping those things in mind, there are a few questions we should ask.

    Would expanded gambling improve the work ethic of Kentuckians?

  • As part of the state’s Don’t Let Them Die campaign, the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet and Operation UNITE have created the KY Help Call Center to connect residents with drug treatment, according to Gov. Matt Bevin’s office.

    The toll-free hotline — 1-833-8KY-HELP (1-833-859-4357) — opens on Dec. 1 and is intended for individuals struggling with substance abuse as well as family members.

  • Could legal medical marijuana be on the horizon in Kentucky?

    Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes said Wednesday she wants to legalize medical marijuana in the Bluegrass State by 2018.

    A task force, led by Grimes, will also study and propose potential implementation and regulation processes.

    In a statement, Grimes said, “2018 is and must be the year when Kentucky finally steps up on medical marijuana. We have to get this done to help Kentuckians who are hurting.”

  • The leaves fell and the weather grew cooler as we transitioned into this blustery November. As Thanksgiving quickly approaches, the Legislature continues to hold Interim Joint Committee meetings throughout the Commonwealth and in Frankfort.

  • As the current Commander of the Spencer County American Veterans (AMVETS) Post 129, I  am writing this letter to say thank you to all of Spencer County for the awesome support we receive here in Taylorsville and all of Spencer County.
    Post 129 is made up of veterans and/or active members of all branches of our military and we welcome for membership, any and all who have served in our armed forces and received an honorable discharge.

  • The Spencer County Animal Shelter recently held its second annual It’s All About the Paws fundraising dinner. Once again, this community showed its support for the shelter and our county’s animals, and we could not be more grateful.

  • After reading John Riley’s letter to the editor of November 1, 2017, and his reference to petty politics, I have to ask of his petty, dirty and childish politics of solely stopping the paving of the road I live on, at my property line.

    To add insult to injury, on the first county mowing, the mower stopped at my property line also. This mowing was followed in the fall after Johnson grass was taller than six feet.

  • State Representative Rocky Adkins, Democrat House Minority Leader, wrote a guest newspaper column “on behalf of the other 35 members of the Kentucky House Democratic Caucus” criticizing the proposed pension fix currently being debated in the legislature.

  • In the wake of allegations against Alabama Senate Candidate Roy Moore, I offer the following reminder that we in America have a moral and legal obligation of due process.

    Sexual abuse and assault are serious offenses and over the past several weeks, we’ve been bombarded with allegations, admissions and apologies from Hollywood over the abuse of women.

    It’s good that victims are willing to come forward to and that they are being listened to.

  • An initial statement by House Majority Leader Jonathan Shell last Friday that then-Speaker Jeff Hoover “has the full support” of the Republican caucus following claims of a sexual harassment settlement were as wrong as a preliminary police report that Sen. Rand Paul suffered only “minor injuries” when physically assaulted by a neighbor at his home in a gated community in Bowling Green.

    It didn’t take long for the truth about the attack on Paul to come out; he suffered bruised lungs and several broken ribs – hardly “minor.”

  • The pension crisis continues to dominate headlines across Kentucky as state lawmakers wrestle with ways to preserve the retirement systems for teachers and other state workers without bankrupting the Commonwealth’s coffers.

    Years of mismanagement and inadequate funding have resulted in the real possibility that the system will run out of money to pay the promised pensions of those about to retire and those already retired, not to mention those who are just starting or who are in the middle of their careers.

  • This week all across our nation individuals and communities will honor our Veterans. Originally called Armistice Day, this recognition was enacted by President Woodrow Wilson to mark the end of World War 1 on November 11, 1918. Congress made this a federal holiday in 1938 and the name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954. The original resolution says, “the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding.”

  • As an American, what scares you the most? Is it Russian attempts to meddle in and influence our elections? Could it be the growing nuclear threat posed by North Korea or the continued danger from radical Islamic terrorism?

    Those outside threats are indeed worth keeping a close eye on and even taking proactive steps to thwart any attempts to endanger us or our allies.

  • Enough is Enough!

    I watched first hand with my history classes as the twin towers fell, the Pentagon was attacked, and the passengers of Flight 93 sacrificed themselves in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.  Like many other Americans, I said I was willing to give up a little privacy to make flying safer.

  • As County Judge Executive I have had many concerned citizens and county employees asking if I will be running for re-election. So, I want to take this opportunity to publicly answer that question. My answer right now is: I don’t know, yet.  Here’s why.

  • I am deeply concerned about the pension reform framework recently made public.

    These proposals challenge the contract rights of members, lower the standard of living of employees now and in retirement, and will worsen the cash-flow crisis in the state employee pension plan.

  • “If these United States can be called a body, then Kentucky can be called its heart.” - Jesse Stuart.

    As fall break ended this weekend, hundreds of folks from our community made the long trek home from the beach or some other far-away vacation land after a nice break from the routine.

  • “Keeping the Promise,” our plan to save Kentucky’s pension systems, keeps the promise made to Kentucky’s current employees while also meeting the legal and moral obligations we owe to those who have already retired. Promises made are promises kept.

    Make no mistake: there will be no changes, clawbacks or reductions to the paychecks of current retirees, and there will be protections for healthcare benefits. That is a promise you can literally take to the bank.