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Opinion

  • Have you ever felt like you were witnessing something big? That suddenly, even if in a small way, you were a part of something that was about to make a difference?
    I had that feeling last week, and I hope many of you did, too, or will soon enough.
    I had just walked outside the Taylorsville City Commission meeting, where, in almost a moment’s notice, a state senator and a representative from our congressman’s office had shown up to take part in the discussion about Taylorsville’s levee.

  • The postgame handshake is one of the fundamentals of sports taught from the earliest ages. From the time kids are old enough to chew on their glove, put on an oversized football helmet, or use their short legs to chase down a soccer ball, the gesture at the end of the game where winners and losers meet and congratulate each other for a “good game” is almost universally observed.

  •  One week out of every year is set aside as National Newspaper Week — a week when, on a national scale, we celebrate the importance of newspapers, their trustworthiness and their value in your lives.
    This year’s national theme is “Your community, your newspaper, your life.”
    Sound familiar?
    During the other 51 weeks of the year, The Spencer Magnet’s slogan is “Your community. Your newspaper.” But we are also about “Your life.”

  • America's theme today is 'force'

    By John Shindlebower

  • America's theme today is 'force'

    By John Shindlebower

  • This week, you’ll notice the addition of a few lines onto our What’s Happening disclaimer. In addition to pointing out that our free community listings are for public meetings, notices and events hosted by not-for-profit organizations, we’ve felt it necessary to point out a few things that, time after time, we get asked to list in that section.
    This week we added the following: Events, contests and open houses hosted by businesses do not qualify for a listing in What’s Happening.

  • As we move into fall and our schedules become full with our kids’ homework and after-school activities, it’s always a good time to focus on their safety, too.  Much like the calls and e-mails I receive from constituents in need of the Veteran’s Crisis Hotline, I also receive a number of calls and emails from constituents looking for information on the Amber Alert program, as well as the best way to get information on sexual predators in the community.

  • When you read this article, fall will be several days old. Where did summer go? Due to the unusual weather conditions, we have just wrapped up our Summer Roadside Litter Abatement drive.
    The recycling center has gotten used to the new baler we got through a Kentucky Pride grant from the Division of Waste Management at Frankfort.
    Our students have gotten settled in their classrooms for the next year of learning.
    But we have so many activities coming up in October that we will not have time to sit down.

  • I learned early Tuesday morning that Spencer County stalwart C.L. Glasscock passed away. C.L. was a true friend of the newspaper and my immediate reaction was to be heartbroken.
    When had I last seen him? What had we talked about? What would be my last memories of this wonderful man?
    However, my coworker, Mallory Bilger, was quick to say to me, “I have complete certainty he is with Jesus.”
    This comment was enough to make me shed a joyous tear.

  • This week, we’re frustrated — with everyone and everything, it seems. So frustrated, in fact, that we’re not exactly sure with whom we’re most frustrated. But we’ll name a top three:

  • Sometimes reporters get bad reputations as ruthless diehards who will do anything to get a story, and a lot of times, they have to be.
    But things here at The Spencer Magnet, as well as at hundreds of smaller weeklies across the country, are a little different.
    We become ingrained in the community.
    Though some people look at me as though I’m still “not from around here,” it’s more common for someone to ask why I wasn’t at this or that event than for someone to ask me why I am there.

  • Use local assets to better community

    I just wanted to respond to Ashley Scoby’s editorial in the Aug. 14 issue of the Magnet.
    Ashley gave us invaluable insight into some of the problems with this county. Her editorial was not mean-spirited, but was a concise appraisal and we should pay attention.
    In a few short months, she clearly saw the good and bad of Spencer County. She couldn’t have been more to the point and I admire her honesty. It is up to us to take it from there.

  • Three accidents occurred on Saturday within eight hours of each other and probably within fewer than eight feet of each other.
    Two motorcycles and an SUV fell victim to a sharp drop-off along Ky. 44 West inside of city limits heading out of Taylorsville.
    This roadway — the twisty, turning Ky. 44 — has been on the state’s “schedule” for years. Several phases of the project have been completed, but none of those phases entails construction or implementation.

  • After nearly 18 months, one lawsuit and one plan declared unconstitutional, the House of Representatives and the Senate finally passed a redistricting plan this past week during a Special Session in Frankfort.
    Given all the past history of redistricting stretching back to the Kentucky Supreme Court’s decision to throw out the plan that passed in 2012, it was somewhat refreshing that we could come together and pass a plan that for the most part passed along bipartisan lines.

  • Hello, I’m Jimmy Higdon, and I am honored to be your new state Senator for Spencer County.

  • Back in the early days of human activity, the earth was covered with about 18 billion acres of forest lands with trees of various types. Today, that has shrunk to less than 11 billion acres.
    Wood in general helped create civilization as we know it today. Even when building with brick, concrete and steel, a lot of wood is involved in each project. We have been exposed to using wood in so many different ways, we have lost the sense of its importance in our world today.

  • To many, August signifies the end of summer, the start of a new school year or the last full month without football.
    However, to a subset of the population, namely journalists and those serving on or with taxing entities, it signifies the beginning of tax season — when cities, counties and taxing districts set their property tax rates for the following year.

  • Our young ones again face the challenges of absorbing all the knowledge necessary to survive in our modern world.
    For us old people, the challenge is finding the way to grab their attention. Today’s world is a very fast-paced, high-charged distracting environment. To make matters worse, new products are brought to market before you have learned to use the item it replaces. That tends to create a “throw-away” society.

  • I came into Taylorsville as the new girl, not knowing a soul within Spencer County and having no horse in the constant political race.
    Arriving with a clean slate allowed me to see the county through clear lenses not fogged by family history, personal squabbles or long-standing rumors.

  • A lot of things can happen in four years: a teenager completes high school, a young adult earns an engineering degree, a president serves a full term, the Olympics gear up for another go. But can Spencer County get light poles installed in that time frame?
    Apparently not.
    According to our very own archives, UPS donated several massive light poles to the county in September 2009. Those poles were unloaded at Ray Jewell Park and those poles lay in that same location four years later.