• GOP gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin has been criticized by the Attorney General Jack Conway and his supporters for actions they consider shady. By doing so, the Conway campaign has opened the door to the daylight on the corruption in Kentucky.

  • With Kentucky’s instant-racing machines crossing the billion-dollar threshold earlier this spring, and as Kentuckians spend billions of dollars more each year at casinos along the Ohio River, House Speaker Greg Stumbo said “that the time has come for voters to decide the expanded-gaming issue once and for all.”

  • Earlier this summer, President Obama announced a deal had been struck between Iran and the United States and other countries that purports to curtail, but not end Iran’s nuclear program. Kentuckians have the right to know whether this deal will actually make America and her allies safer. I want to assure those in the Commonwealth that America’s safety will be my foremost concern when the U.S. Senate takes up this issue and gives the proposed deal a thorough and fair review in the coming weeks.

  • One of this interim period’s hot button issues is finding a way to stabilize the Kentucky Teachers Retirement System (KTRS) and the Kentucky Employee Retirement System (KRS). KTRS was debated in the waning days of the last General Assembly, and the momentum continues. As a member of the Public Pension Oversight Board, I have had a seat at the table on these issues, continuing to deliberate with the various stakeholders and legislators who want to find a solution.

  • Wanted to give a shout and thank you to the road maintenance department. We live off Hochstrauser near Plum Ridge. They paved the road, bridge, and several areas. It’s nice and smooth now and a pleasure.  Thank you very much. 

    Randal Mattocks

  • The Spencer County High School Site-Based Decision Making Council really had little choice last week when they approved a new club at the school. The club, Spectrum Advocacy for Equality, was initially proposed to give a voice to LGBT students. However, after some concern about focusing solely on sexual orientation, the club was renamed and repurposed as an organization that will oppose bullying of all types and promote tolerance for all students.

  • Two weeks ago, I wrote an opinion letter published in the Magnet about a proposed tax increase being discussed by the Fiscal Court. My letter was critical of the justification and process (drip spend, drip raise taxes, drip repeat).

    An email on this subject was received, essentially informing me that I was wrong (all inclusive). Also the email indicated that all could have been explained if I had availed myself to scheduling a meeting with the sender.

  • I believe there are two types of pride. There’s the pride that comes before the fall, as the Bible defines. But there’s also the pride that helps pick us back up when we have fallen. The latter is not arrogance, but a recognition that we weren’t made to be failures.

    It’s ok for communities to have pride as well, especially when the object of that pride are the people who share it with us. Of course, sometimes the actions or inactions results in shame. Here’s a few examples:

  • Attorney General Jack Conway is right: the state Board of Education violated Kentucky’s open-meetings law when an ad hoc committee it hastily created in April conducted business in unannounced, closed-session conditions while hiring a search firm to aid in finding a replacement for outgoing commissioner Terry Holliday.

  • In case anyone forgot how incredible the people are in our small town, I would like to remind everyone.

    My husband passed away at the end of July. I have two children. I lost my father when I was 13 and remember how lost I felt. When I went back to school, nobody showed any kind of support. I was so worried that my children would feel the same way.

  • “It’s been years since I’ve talked about compensation [for the sale of fetal body parts], so let me just figure out what others are getting . . . . If [the price for selling the body parts is] low, we can bump it up. I want a Lamborghini.”

  • They say hindsight is 20/20, and that old adage is often proven true through television reruns.
    Some famous television characters were created and scripted to push a certain agenda and the writers intentionally framed their words and opinions to appear clownish, unintelligent and sometimes just outrageous. But inevitably, watching those shows today through the prism of time, lines originally intended to get laughs might now raise a few eyebrows and cause us to think, “You know what, they were right.”

  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers have released their final rule defining what they believe constitutes “waters of the United States.” This effort, in their own terms, is to provide clarity on what constitutes waters of the United States, and to protect streams and wetlands that we depend on for our health, communities, and economy.

  • It is so refreshing to have a newspaper editor come forward and lay out the truth on something as important as the current abortion debate. Watching the clips of the Planned Parenthood meeting with buyers of body parts is sickening to say the least. This brings to mind a recent bumper sticker that said “Seems to me that all the people in favor of abortion have already been born”. I think this sums it up!

    Arnie Mueller,

  • I read the Magnet’s report of the Fiscal Court’s meeting with some wonderment. Maybe it’s just me but here are a couple of observations that contribute to the ‘wonderment’ of ‘What the heck is happening?’

    We have a Judge Executive who admitted that he could not read the budget in my presence. This contributes to the ‘wonderment’.

  • In about three months, Spencer County taxpayers will be receiving their tax bills, meaning local governments and taxing districts are now faced with setting tax rates.

    The annual debate over cutting costs or raising taxes is not exclusive to Spencer County, but a discussion had by elected officials at all levels.

  • There’s nothing civil about war, but that doesn’t always have to apply to the political process that seems to grow nastier, meaner and more vile every election cycle.

    In a sense, politics is a war - a war of ideas and philosophies. I’ve never been a fan of those who say compromise and bipartisanship are always the answer. Politics are partisan by nature, and that’s a good thing. Despite what’s taught in this post-modern world, there remains a difference between right and wrong, good and evil, and often politics are divided on those very lines.

  • I have a question for the Fair Board concerning the baby and youth show.

    Why would they let people from Spencer County (and they also work here with the public), be the judges for the show? The judges that I saw actually were talking to one of the mothers of the contestants prior to the starting of the show, and her child won.