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Opinion

  • A constituent of mine recently brought to my attention that too often we let the discussion about Kentucky’s drug scourge fall by the wayside. Admittedly, I believe that happens because no one has a good solution to the problem and although we have made effort after effort to combat the epidemic we still have little to show for it. In 2015 Kentucky’s heroin-related death rate increased to 6.9 deaths for every 100,000 people—23 times the rate in 2009.

  • A recent opinion letter from Scott Pulliam suggested that in order for our country to restore “common decency” in America that we should start at the top with President Trump and his “crass and crude” conduct or his “moral and intellectual pollution” he spouts on a daily basis.

  • Only surviving combat soldiers can tell their story with any accuracy.

    As I was hanging my American flag up today in remembrance of Memorial Day (May 25, 2017), I was revisiting my last minutes in Vietnam after being air lifted out of the field, full of morphine with my best buddy laying next to me in a UH-1 helicopter. I was going home. I was one of the lucky ones so to speak.

  • The two entities most responsible for the freedoms we enjoy in America  are also the two we often tend to take for granted. I’m talking about God and our veterans.

    This Monday, a scant crowd of a few dozen showed up for a Memorial Day ceremony downtown. It was an opportunity to pay respects and honor those who have died for our freedom. The crowd was disappointing.

  • I recently sat down with Gov. Bevin for an exclusive interview to hear about significant legislative progress, continuing challenges and current initiatives to address Kentucky’s most pressing needs. We talked about a host of issues including foster care and adoption reform, education policy, the state pension crisis, and a special session to modernize the tax code.

  • As many as two million Americans are struggling with prescription drug addiction across the nation.  Tragically, heroin and opioid overdoses claim an average of 91 lives every day.  This startling trend continues to get worse, especially here in Kentucky.

    But together, we can do more to fight back, and I will continue to assist those in Kentucky who are working to fight the epidemic.

  • On May 19th, I re-introduced the Senior Citizens Tax Elimination Act (H.R. 2552). This bill would assist our struggling middle class by eliminating an unnecessary and unjust double-tax on seniors.

  • The month of May has been declared National Community Action Month by Governor Bevin.   Community Action has a history that dates back to the Johnson presidency. A significant amount of services are provided by Community Action in Spencer County.   Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency has been serving low income families and senior citizens in Spencer County since the 1970s and in the early 80s evolved into a Community Action Agency.   

  • I have a solution for the issue between the Sheriff and Fiscal Court.  For anyone interested, they can read KRS - Title IX - Chapter 70 - 150 about one of a Sheriff’s duties. In KRS - Title IX - Chapter 70 - 540, they can read about the County Judge’s power to establish a County Police Force. In fact, read the entire KRS - Title IX - 70 to enlighten yourself.

  • I’d like to say that I agree with the observations of John Shindlebower in his article, “We’ve destroyed innocence.” This is unusual for me because ideologically, we are at opposite ends of the political spectrum but it is also unusual that the column doesn’t appear to contain any political content. So I wish to give Mr. Shindlebower kudos for his well-crafted and thoughtful piece and offer something of my own.

  • The Spencer County Animal Shelter would like to give great thanks to all who attended our shelter festival, A Ruff Day at the Fairgrounds. We’re very grateful for all who volunteered to organize the event, and the vendors who brought their wares for sale. And of course we could not have held this event without the support of a host of businesses, organizations, first responders and volunteers.

  • The House of Representatives passed their ObamaCare replacement bill and sent it to the House.  The only two positive things I can say about it are:  it is not ObamaCare and it is out of the House.  I hope the Senate does better.

  • It’s impossible to travel into the future, but there are times when you can see it. The photo on the front page of this week’s paper not only shows you the future, but the future is staring back at you in the form of some happy, smiling kids who graduated last week from Spencer County Preschool.

    These kids will start Kindergarden next year, which means they are scheduled to graduate 13 years from now, making them the class of 2030. Do you feel old yet?

  • Like Bernie Sanders refuses to acknowledge socialism’s devastating impact on previously prosperous Venezuela, supporters of Kentucky’s pension status quo – who seem largely illiterate about how defined-benefit systems work – refuse to concede that inadequate funding is not the primary cause of the commonwealth’s pension woes.

    If it was, then why is the County Employees’ Retirement System (CERS) only around 60-percent funded despite making 100 percent of its actuarially required contributions through the years?

  • Over a month has passed since the conclusion of the 2017 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly but my work as your senator has not slowed. Between answering your well thought-out letters and phone calls, I have been visiting with constituents in our district and listening to your concerns and preparing to discuss many of those topics during the Interim.

  • “The thing I like about baseball is that it’s one-on-one. You stand up there alone, and if you make a mistake, it’s your mistake. If you hit a home run, it’s your home run.”
                Hank Aaron

    Hank Aaron is baseball’s all-time home run king. Yes, I know technically Barry Bonds put more balls over the fence than Aaron, but he did so with the assistance of performance enhancing drugs, so in my mind, and the mind of many baseball purists - those numbers are fraudelent.

  • Kentucky voters demanded change when they went to the polls in November, placing the House of Representatives in Republican control for the first time in nearly a century. By granting GOP super-majorities for the first time in both the Senate and the House, Kentuckians made it clear that they were tired of “business as usual” in Frankfort.

  • One of the hardest lessons we learn, often as a child, is that we simply can’t afford everything. That lesson is made even more frustrating when we are surrounded by others who can. Unless you’ve always been blessed with wealth, you’ve experienced this at some point in your life.

    Of course, lessons are intended to be teachers, and humble means help nurture our ability to set priorities and make wise decisions. These lessons help us plan and prepare ways we can improve our lot so we can possibly  afford some of the nicer things in the future.

  • One of the most iconic images of the 20th Century was the photo taken of the flag raising at Iwo Jima during the latter stages of World War II.

    That image captured the bravery of Americn fighting men who fought for weeks for possession of a strategic island  that would help position the U.S. to mount, what was thought to be, an imminent attack on Japan, if the war continued to linger.

  • Wheaties was a staple breakfast food in my childhood and between spoonfuls of the stuff that was supposed to make me strong I remember staring at the box donned with Olympic Gold Medalist Bruce Jenner ready to spring the javelin. It was the breakfast of champions and of course what eight-year-old boy didn’t aspire to be a world champion athlete?

    Jenner now goes by Caitlyn Jenner and revealed in his memoir scheduled to be released Wednesday that his sex reassignment surgery was a “success.”

    How times have changed.