.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • My name is Dave Barnes and I have called and went before the board and complained. Our county officials don’t want to hear it.
    Go online and you will find mountains of information on coal ash and you will see the bad far outweighs the good. The state does not use it. The federal government does not want to label it hazardous material, because they would then be responsible for billions in cleanup and health issues.

  • We read with great interest the opinion piece in last week’s paper regarding Family Court Judge John David Myles. The portrayal of Judge Myles could not be further from our experience with him and his Court.
    Judge Myles was always prepared, professional and fair to all who appeared before him. He is a passionate advocate for children, education and families. Add to that a loyal friend, devoted husband and hard worker.

  • The day is finally here. Ever since Judge John David Myles was first elected to take the bench of the Family Court Division of the 53rd Judicial Circuit in November 2006, I have waited to write this letter. He has recently announced he will seek a second term in the next election.

  • I am writing in response to the article about winter road-clearing operations. Spencer County uses cinders, a form of coal ash. Coal ash is the waste that is left after coal is combusted.
    Now, this letter is not an attack on coal. I am just providing the facts about what is left after you burn coal. Coal ash typically contains heavy metals including arsenic, barium, lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium and selenium, to list a few. If inhaled, these toxins can cause cancer, respiratory distress and other health issues.

  • We must give credit where credit is due. We want to thank Mayor Don Pay and the Taylorsville City Commission for doing right by residents and other interested parties who attended the special meeting Thursday night, Feb. 6,

  • On Jan. 23, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway determined that the Taylorsville City Commission recently was in violation of the state’s Open Meetings law “by failing to make adequate provision for the convenience of the public during a closed session.”
    The decision was the result of a complaint filed by resident Lawrence Trageser, who petitioned the commission after it’s Dec. 3 meeting to change the way it runs legal closed sessions of its public meetings.

  • Everyone needs to take a deep breath and relax — no one is tearing down our whiskey barns.
    The blogosphere and twittersphere — never ones to overreact — exploded after the Jan. 13 announcement that Japanese-owned Suntory Holdings would purchase Beam Inc. for $16 billion. Even the Gray Lady herself, The New York Times, ran the story about the announcement under the headline “My Old Osaka Home.”

  • The second week of the 2014 regular session brought schedules packed with meetings, rallies, press conferences and hearings on bills.  We met with constituents, citizen groups and fellow lawmakers as we began vetting proposed legislation.

  • Two hot topics in and around our area right now are the weather (When is it going to snow and how much? And how cold is it going to get this time?) and the flu (Do you  have it? Who do you know who has it?).
    Our hope is that these two things can work together for some good. Perhaps the cold will be cold enough to kill out some of the viruses being passed around.

  • By now, you’ve probably seen or heard that my time at The Spencer Magnet is coming to a close.
    In short, I was presented with an excellent job opportunity, which will be a better fit for my family and will put me closer to home, so I accepted it. Although I am sad to leave the acquaintances I have here in Spencer County, as well as the community I’ve grown to love as my own over the last three years, all chapters must end in order for a new one to begin.

  • Editor's note: The Spencer Magnet received notice Wednesday morning that Thursday's special meeting of the City Commission will be rescheduled because of broken pipes and water issues in the City Hall Annex.

     

  • I send my best regards to you and your family for the New Year. The holidays are behind us now, and we strive to get back into our routine with school and work. For me, Jan. 7 convened the 2014 General Assembly, a 60-day legislative session creating the next two year budget for Kentucky. This year is loaded with issues that require legislative action as the Senate Majority strives to make pathways for economic growth and fight for fiscal responsibility.

  • Phil Robertson, the bearded, straight-shooting and straight-talking patriarch from the Louisiana Duck Dynasty family may be the next great American hero.
    Phil has reminded Americans that it’s both okay and admirable to speak your mind. It may not be without backlash or consequences, but dadgum it, don’t let anyone intimidate you from having or expressing an opinion. It’s a lesson we need today more than ever.

  • In March 2012, a group led by Jane Fonda called “The Woman’s Media Center” publically called for the FCC to remove Rush Limbaugh from the airwaves. Their argument was basically that because (as they see it) Mr. Limbaugh belittles and mocks a wide range of groups that he is not acting “in the public interest” whatever that means.

  • As we get ready to close out 2013, let me wish you and your family a happy New Year!
    It’s time again for members of the Kentucky General Assembly to meet for a 60-day legislative session that is frequently called a “budget session.” During this time, my colleagues and I will work to develop a two-year budget for state government. We will also discuss other issues important to Kentuckians, including jobs, economic development, education and health care.

  • Last week, my former boss, comrade and counterpart in Anderson County, Ben Carlson, took to the pages of his newspaper to go on a little rant about Spencer County.
    Carlson, who readily admits he has a twisted sense of humor, attacked our competitive spirit all because he’s ashamed his county lost to us in a very important “contest” around this time last year.
    Well, dear readers, I do not question your competitive nature, but instead, I hope to invoke it because we are up against our neighbors in the same contest this year.

  • There was a time when a reasoned, common-sense argument against easing restrictions on access to alcohol could be made and people would listen. Alcohol is a drug that can significantly decrease a person’s ability to make good, sound judgments and there is no shortage of statistics and data available to serve as evidence that alcohol is responsible for countless deaths and injuries each year.

  • Let me start with a little history: The 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified almost 80 years ago (Dec. 5, 1933), yet remnants of this epic failure (such as laws prohibiting Sunday sales of alcoholic beverages) still remain.

  • Yes, I’m one of those crazy people. Those people who get out at 4 a.m. the day after Thanksgiving in the crowds, the traffic, the noise and the shopping lines. But it’s not for the best deals and it’s not because I absolutely have to have that $200 laptop (Limit five per store).