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Opinion

  • We now have a Kentucky governor that is interested in taking Kentucky from being listed as one of the top most corrupt states/commonwealths in the Union.

    He has done much to put Kentucky in line to bring businesses with the Right to Work law. Surrounding states have been eating our lunch by getting more big businesses in their states than we do. Now we are on an equal footing and it’s up to the negotiators to get the companies.

  • One hundred and fifty years ago, Spencer County and the rest of the United States was attempting to heal from a civil war that divided a nation, communities and even families.

  • Most of America tuned into the Super Bowl Sunday night, and most of America was likely tempted to tune out when the game turned lopsided, with Atlanta forging ahead to take a 28-3 lead late in third quarter. Only the most optimistic of Patriot fans could have hoped for the amazing comeback that would ultimately lead to New England winning their record fifth Super Bowl.

  • Regarding Governor Bevin’s guest commentary in last week’s Magnet, I made some observations I’d like to share with your readers. Beginning with the title, Great once again, I’m not really sure to whom it should be attributed but there’s no doubt who was responsible for the article itself.

  • The Kentucky Chamber applauds Senate Majority Whip Jimmy Higdon on his leadership to make right-to-work legislation a reality during the first week of the 2017 General Assembly, ensuring Kentucky is a state where businesses want to locate.

  • If you believe the media reports, North Carolina is reeling economically because of lost revenue and a tarnished image resulting from their bathroom laws. After lawmakers passed legislation that would have required people to use the bathroom that coincides with their biological gender (I doubt our Founding Fathers ever thought the Republic would have ever devolved to this point), the rash of protests and boycotts began.

  • Kentucky felt an earthquake on November 8, 2016 that drastically changed the makeup of Frankfort and provided the Bluegrass state with a viable path to finally adopt needed reforms. With an eager Governor and a General Assembly intent on improving Kentucky’s business climate and education system, Kentuckians from all parts of the state should be excited about one thing: opportunity.

  • This week our nation experienced a wonderful American political tradition, as we witnessed the peaceful transfer of executive power. The new President  assumed office riding a wave of voter enthusiasm not seen since Reagan. For an accurate barometer of that enthusiasm, one should look beyond even the popular vote totals and the Electoral College.

  • An impressive crowd showed up at a public forum for the Spencer County School Board’s redistricting effort, which will assign students to the new Taylorsville Elementary School prior to it opening next August.

    District personnel explained how they approached the process of dividing the county into two, and deciding which students would go to the new school, and which ones would stay at Spencer County Elementary School.

  • Vast changes are on the horizon in public education at the national level regarding the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, and at the state level considering the political landscape, the emphasis on charter schools, assessment, pensions, and additional components of Senate Bill 1.

  • The last election was the most ridiculous election I’ve ever participated in.  The people elected the most unqualified and disgusting person in the history of the country for president.  He trash talked minorities, said because he is a celebrity it is alright for him to fondle women, mocked the disabled, etc., etc.

  • I attended the Fiscal Court meeting on January 17, and was disappointed with the court’s decision to pay for Judge Riley’s legal fees accrued by the attorney he hired.  I listened to the reasoning presented by the judge and members of the court, but disagree with the decision to pay for outside council.  I believe our county attorney is capable of handling this case on his own.

  • Over the next few weeks, many discussions will be had with firearms instructors and citizens across Kentucky regarding constitutional carry.  As you may know Kentucky legislatures have SB7 almost ready to be brought to a  vote. This bill does not change current law of where you can carry only how  you can carry.

    Currently in the State of KY, it is legal to open carry without permit at  the age of 18. Many citizens do at times.  The new law, if passed, would  allow a person to conceal the firearm from view.

  • Come Friday, Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States of America - and there is nothing you or anyone else can do about it.

    That’s not written as a gloat. I’ve never been a Trumpster and I had to eat a plate of deep fried crow in November because I never thought he’d actually win the election to begin with. But I can’t say I’m disappointed with the outcome, even though his impending presidency seems to have divided this country even more than the election.

  • The Elizabethtown Independent School Board recently became the first local education oversight body in Kentucky to express collective hostility toward giving parents the option of a different type of public school experience for their children.

    It passed a resolution claiming a charter-school policy “unilaterally takes critically needed funds from local school districts and redirects them to charter schools, thereby debilitating the significantly underfunded system of funding for public education for all Kentucky schools.”

  • Every day, Kentuckians are reading headlines that Obamacare is a failure. Supporters of Obamacare promised lower costs, but it sent them soaring. They promised families could keep their plans or doctors, but many Kentuckians have seen their options limited. Every year since this law’s passage, a growing number of people in Kentucky and throughout the nation have called for Obamacare’s repeal. A recent poll showed that 8 out of 10 Americans want Obamacare to be significantly changed or replaced.

  • We have noted on this page the similarities between Obamacare and Kentucky’s own failed health insurance “reform” law of 1994. Both laws promised to bring competition to the insurance market. Instead they destroyed it, and premiums soared.

  • New legislation from Frankfort to restrict abortion is welcome news. I know there are many voices who say abortion is strictly a woman’s choice and that men in Frankfort and Washington have no business interfering, but I disagree. Allow me to share something personal.

    Six years ago, I was taking photos at a Spencer County Lady Bears basketball game when my wife phoned me and told me we needed to talk. I could tell it wasn’t good news. My heart sunk a little, but she said she would be out in the parking lot and for me to come out and meet her in the car.

  • Mark Mix, President of the 2.8 million-member National Right to Work Committee, praised the Kentucky Legislature’s passage of the Kentucky Right to Work Bill (HB1), issuing the following statement on the struggle to end forced unionism in the Bluegrass State and encouraging legislators in Missouri and New Hampshire to follow Kentucky’s lead:

    “This is a great day for the hardworking men and women of the Bluegrass State as the House and Senate have now passed the Kentucky Right to Work Bill.

  • Angry labor union members on Saturday said they don’t know how they became public enemy No. 1 in Kentucky’s 2017 legislative session.

    Hundreds of workers in boots and heavy coats poured onto every public floor of the state Capitol to loudly protest final passage of three bills that they say will weaken unions and reduce construction workers’ wages.

    “It’s an attack on the working people,” said Chris Kendall, 44, a member of Local 184 of the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union in Paducah.