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Opinion

  • “Bad officials are elected by good citizens who do not vote.” – A quote by George Jean Nathan, American journalist.

    I recently read that only 30 percent of Americans consider themselves habitual voters – meaning that whether it is a presidential race, local election or a single issue on the ballot, these citizens are going to exercise their right to vote. The rest of the population are equally divided into two categories:  periodic voters and the unregistered.

    Unfortunately, these statistics are not what I would consider surprising.

  • Guest column by Dave Adkisson, President and CEO, Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

     

     The Kentucky General Assembly concluded its regular session in an angry, finger-pointing finale, with the House and Senate publicly criticizing each other for their failure to agree on a spending blueprint to guide Kentucky through the challenging financial times of the next two years.

  • April 24, 2010 we held our 2nd annual “Carnival for a Cure.” Despite all weather forecast we were blessed with 4 good hours of carnival fun! To God be the Glory!

    All proceeds made went to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Despite the storm, we still made $5,000!

     We couldn’t have done it with out all our sponsors, volunteers, vendors, the 4-H Trailblazers, Affordable Fun, Bounce Around, our fabulous DJ/MC Bobby Marples, musicians, Wendy Edwards, friends, and families.

  • What’s wrong with two of the five headlines on today’s front page? I’ll give you a minute while you glance back over them again.

    Ok. Time’s up. Here’s what I’m talking about:

    • “Mayor gets substantial raise”

    • “School board cuts contracts to save about $80,000”

  • Bill Drury has gone beyond the call of duty. He works for the people beyond his district. He has helped families save their homes and, in some cases, rebuild.

    Our home was robbed and Bill Drury helped us find help. He has always put others needs before his own or his family’s.

    When people were flooded, he was out on crutches helping others in need. When farmers were in a drought, he was there. People all across Spencer County were in need of water and Bill Drury was there fighting for all of us.

  • With the election season in full swing, I felt compelled to share my opinion about the best candidate for Magistrate here in the first district.  We have the opportunity on May 18th to put our community first.  Richard Travelstead exemplifies what a true leader should be.  I have known Mr. Travelstead to always place the community and the citizens of Spencer County first.  From taking a strong stance in defense of homeowners to counseling with troubled teens Richard Travelstead has always and remains committed to doing the “right thing”.

  • When the General Assembly arrived in Frankfort three months ago, it was expected that we would pass a number of important pieces of legislation, and we did just that.  However our primary goal for the session was to pass a biannual budget for the Commonwealth, and as both chambers adjourned “sine die” on the 60th and final session day, that goal (of passing a budget) was not accomplished.

  • I am very concerned that some people in our county wear blinders – the ones that give you tunnel vision so you never notice what is going on other than what is right in front of you.

    Not being able to see the entire picture distorts your image and ability to make good decisions. We have people running for office that have no experience, no education and no qualifications to hold the office of county judge executive, etc.

    One candidate can not settle his own financial problems without filing bankruptcy.

  • I remember many years ago a popular TV show called Rawhide starring a very young Clint Eastwood as Rowdy Yates.  The show centered around the adventures of a bunch of cowboys out west on a cattle drive.  Every year, for the past four years, we have had our own version.  I call it “The Great Taylorsville CAT’L Roundup”.  Not cattle, but cats.

  • Birdie, you are correct, I do not judge myself.  I leave that up to my family, my friends and judgment day.  Nobody else matters.  No, I take that back.  All children matter.  And, that is why I have become so politically critical in the last few years.

     I spend a lot of time reading the paper, working on the internet and listening to the news.  I report what I hear, read, and see.  Along with my research, I only write about what I find and is reported.

  • The senior and parents of Spencer County High School’s Class of 2010 are working very hard to raise funds for Project Graduation. Graduation and Project Graduation will be held this year May 29.

    This post party is designed for all seniors to have a drug-free, alcohol-free and smoke-free night in a safe, supervised environment filled with food, games, events and prizes. We are committed to providing this evening to our graduating class as they celebrate this achievement together.

  • National media report that Saturday mail delivery may go the way of the milk wagon, and that a wide majority of Americans think that’s ok.

    Hold on.

    Congress must act first, and that is not likely to happen soon. Some Congressional leaders worry about trimming mail service, even if only 35 percent of people surveyed by Gallup last summer disapprove.

    Poll results are guided by the way questions are asked. They don’t give a full picture. Knowing that, Congress is not yet ready to decide.

  • Enough is enough! 

    While the country struggles to re-write it’s ethics code, our county judge executive continued his fall from grace last weekend.  He added to his misuse of the Kentucky Association of Counties credit cards, by being arrested by the state police near Fisherville for drunk driving!

    How bad must his behavior get? 

    He has made Spencer County the laughing stock of the Louisville Metro area.  He has shrugged off every misconduct and now dares to run for re-election!

  • The Spencer Magnet reads like everyone is running for something this election year.

    The candidate John Riley seems like he is in no hurry to say his two cents worth. Is that because he has already said too much? He had to go for the insurance premium tax.

    Woodie Cheek does not have to be elected for he is already a judge. He judges everyone but himself.

  • Fortunately, a possible tragedy was avoided due to the “one law fits all” policy of the Kentucky State Police.

    Spencer County Judge Executive David Jenkins could have severely injured you or someone you love while driving drunk.

    Sympathy should be reserved for those that do not have control over their actions. Once again, he will say, “I did nothing wrong.”

    Hopefully, political favors will not be given by the county attorney.

  • by Lt. Gov. Dan Mongiard

  • by KENT STEVENS

    State Representative

    With the last full working week of the 2010 legislative session of the Kentucky General Assembly behind us, much was accomplished as we closed in on final details of the state’s budget, road plan and passage of bills.

  • by GARY TAPP

    State Senator

    The Senate passed its version of the budget and we are now working with the House of Representatives in a budget conference committee.  This committee is charged with working out the differences between the House and Senate version of the budget bills.

  • Cut waste: Start with signs

    My hat is off to John Riley for vowing in his campaign for Spencer County Judge Executive not to enter the “political yard sign war” until after May 1.

    Yes, these signs have their usefulness in an election, however the clutter of our highways and neighborhood streets with yard signs months before an election can simply get out of control and become an eyesore.

  • by MIKE FARRELL

    In a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, Justice William Brennan wrote this country has “a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.”

    Kentucky legislators failed to honor that principle when they voted to allow elected school board members to evaluate the performance of school superintendents in secret.