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Opinion

  • Are we to trust a man with our future, sewers or otherwise, who can’t recall what he has done in the last six months and can look straight into a camera and say so. (Wasn’t there something about a Co-ed escort service as well?) Trust?

    I recall a lot of stories about those grant applications being written by a lot of people and I wonder how many were written by those taking credit.

    I bet the current economy has been on a lot of peoples minds when they think about looking at unemployment.

  • Like many of you, I have family members in Valley Cemetery and over the past year I have watched a few board members of the corporation destroy the warmth and love some were trying to share.

    With little to no attempt to contact stockholders, they began on Fathers Day removing the flowers and items we left for our loved ones and throwing them in a pile like trash. Many items were broke or damaged beyond recognition.

    I watched as men and women tried to go through the items and locate the things they left for their loved ones.

  • Guest columnist Congressman Brett Guthrie

    Kentuckians are ready for Congress to implement common-sense ideas that create jobs, make health care more affordable for everyone and keep our homeland safe.

    The American people deserve openness, transparency and accountability. Concerned citizens across the country continue to speak out against the majority’s plan to pass a government takeover of health care. Congressional leaders are meeting behind closed doors to draft their final plan for health care reform that will impact every American.

  • Guest columnist Rep. Kent Stevens

    Legislative sessions are much like snowflakes. They appear the same from a distance, but look closely and you’ll see each has a pattern all its own.

    Right now, the 2010 Regular Session that began in Frankfort Tuesday looks to the casual observer like most legislative sessions held in even-numbered years. It will last 60 legislative days. Its main purpose is to pass a state budget before a new two-year budget cycle begins in July. And legislative procedure will be the same, too.

  • How many times have I had the opportunity to do something the correct way and I did just the opposite? I can answer that by saying about 10, 20, 100 or 2000. Although, I never really did think about counting them, did my actions affect anyone else? Definitely, yes they always did. Was I crucified by my friends, family or enemies? No, I was not.

  • I want to thank the Spencer Magnet for the beautifully written article on Matt and our family last week.  It was more than we could have hoped for. Everyone who saw the article was so very complimentary of it.

  • The Chamber of Commerce would like to express our sincere appreciation to everyone who helped make the Chamber’s Christmas on Main a successful event. Thanks to those that weathered the extreme cold including the families who come out year after year and the countless volunteers. We couldn’t do it without you!

    We appreciate the donations from local businesses and individuals sent in from our contribution requests. This fund helps Santa get a head start in his toy workshop for next year.

  • At the beginning of each new year, many people make a list of resolutions to keep in the coming months, such as losing weight or learning a new skill. As you make your list, don’t forget to consider wise financial goals for the year ahead. The Kentucky Society of CPAs suggests you adopt these smart resolutions.

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  • Thanks to everyone that made donations to the Toys for Tots campaign this year. And a special thanks to The Tea Cup, the Family Diner, Dr. Randsdell and Elite Family Dentistry.

    We gave the toys out Dec. 22. It meant a lot to see the parents happy that they could provide their children with something for Christmas.

    Next year we plan to work more closely with Spencer County Family Resource. Anyone that wants to be involved, feel free to call me at home.

  • Just curious, but how many of you really feel like celebrating the New Year?

    I would imagine that revelers of New Year’s Eve 2009 fall into one of two categories: (1) people that would toast the grand opening of a new dry cleaner, or (2) people that wish to bid 2009 a final good riddance.

  • As we celebrate this Christmas and the holiday season with family and friends, I hope we remember to give, to share, to count our blessings, and appreciate the true meaning of Christmas.  This is the season to reflect on what we have achieved this past year with a hope and promise of a new year about to dawn.

  • I ran for governor to better position Kentucky to compete in the future.

     And despite inheriting a budget mess and dealing with an historic national recession that is damaging our economy while limiting state government’s resources, my goals for Kentucky haven’t changed.

     When we emerge from this recession, Kentucky must emerge not shell-shocked and shattered but stronger than before.

  • I just have a few questions:

     Isn’t bonding authority something like a limit on a credit card?  Is  maxing  out at a higher level always a good thing?

    Aren’t amenities like nice eateries and more local jobs what the voters wanted when they voted “wet”?  So why does a city official just cite “more tax revenue”?  Instead of worrying so much about people consuming a drink with dinner, shouldn’t we be more worried about politicians who are intoxicated with tax increases?

  • Quick to judge, you exclaim. Slanderous – libel another proclaims. The deceived spew ignorance from their lips, while embracing and defending the liars we call our local leaders.

  • While watching National Geographic “Wild Kingdom,” recently it sparked my thoughts to Spencer County government.  The made-for-television special was about lions being the kings of the jungle and naturally my ideas jumped to our own jungle cat, “King KACo.”  Now deep in indulgence I referred my energy to our state’s auditors final investigation of KACo and our judge.  After reading it again, I still find it hard to believe elected officials would do what they have accomplished.

  • I’m so glad my letter to the editor received feed back from someone a few months ago.

    I would like to say that slander is a word used when the truth has not been told about an individual or company...etc.

    You are correct; the first amendment gives us our freedom of speech. So in turn that gives you the right to call me a minority, backward thinking, and yes I can’t forget a hypocrite too.

    But really, maybe you need to know someone before the name calling starts or you decide to cast that vote.

  • We’ve just completed another successful fall festival, making this another beautiful day for our church and community. We celebrated a day filled with fun activities for children, yard sales, good food and spiritually uplifting gospel and country music.

    Without the support of many individuals and businesses, the festival would not have been possible. The festival committee would like to thank the community for the support shown to us. No donation or act of kindness was small, each made a big impact on our success.

  • I find it appalling that city officials feel justified using school children in their efforts to legalize additional liquor sales in Taylorsville.

    How else should we interpret the comments in last week’s Magnet regarding the city commission’s effort to have Taylorsville reclassified as a fourth-class city?

    According to the paper, the city’s attorney, Dudley Dale, summarized that the new designation wouldn’t mean a lot to the community, other than increasing the flow of alcohol.

  • Yesterday was bittersweet for this small Magnet staff. After nearly 800 issues, we published our last newspaper in the Charles Warren Building Tuesday afternoon. Today, we will be moving our office a few hundred yards up Main St. to a quaint, two-story white house located across from First Baptist Church.

  • The White House says it has good reasons to bring the terrorists who planned the 9/11 attacks to New York City to try them in a federal courtroom instead of at the secure detention facility at Guantanamo. But I can’t think of any.

    The reasons why that decision is a mistake, however, are easy to list. It puts the tools we use to fight terror at risk. And it is a needless risk to America’s security. And it gives these terrorists a worldwide platform to spread their hateful propaganda.