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Opinion

  • Shame on you John Riley.

    You defeated me two plus years ago in the judge’s general election and I am certainly not a “sore or poor loser.” To the contrary, I am free for the first time in my life.

    As a fulfilled person, I will devote the remainder of my life preparing for the hereafter and being with family.

  • I’ve always loved history, especially Kentucky history. I can’t recall if Mr. Larry Dixon, my 7th grade history teacher at Belmont Junior High School in Winchester, was a highly skilled communicator or not, but something about that unit on Kentucky History grabbed my attention and never let me go.

    So while compiling this larger than usual issue of The Spencer Magnet has been a busy one for us here at the office, it’s been fascinating for me as well as I was able to do a little research into the 150-year history of this publication.

  • Do you know a chronic fake news perpetuator? Mine is my cousin on Facebook. He spreads fake news like it’s his job. He reacts to each sensational headline with the correct amount of outrage. I don’t think it’s intentional. I think he sees someone else sharing these, he believes them to be true, and he clicks share. It is not a problem of malice; it is a problem of media literacy.

  • The Spencer County Parks and Recreation would like to thank all the participants in the Spencer County Youth Basketball League.

    Thanks to the parents and coaches – we couldn’t have done it without you.

    I would also like to thank the Spencer County Fiscal Court, the Spencer County Board of Education and those in maintenance at the schools – Joe Oliver, Dee Oliver, Jenny Nation and Mike and Rodney.

  • On March 15th, Kentucky legislators voted in favor of charter schools being allowed to infiltrate our state. We could start seeing charter schools being built as early as the next school year.

    Do not be misled or fooled. This was not just a bill for Louisville and Lexington. Rural areas such as Spencer County are at risk of having these schools invade our county.

  • The great divide in America was on full display in Louisville Monday night as President Donald J. Trump held a rally at Freedom Hall that drew a packed house of over 20,000.

    The event also drew large crowds of protesters who set up their protest lines nearby with signs and posters as they planned an inhospitable welcome to both the President and those who support him.

  • Each of us had a school teacher who we still remember today. That teacher may have spent extra time helping us hone a skill we needed a little more time to learn. Or maybe he or she was a listening ear when we couldn’t find one anywhere else.

  • Early mornings turned to late nights and spirited debate echoed through the House and Senate chambers as we closed in on the final days of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. A flurry of bills were sent to Governor Matt Bevin’s desk this week, highlighted by measures to empower our Kentucky teachers and create better learning environments for our Kentucky students.

  • On March 7, the Kentucky House of Representatives passed House Bill 58, informally dubbed the ‘Tim Tebow’ bill. If signed into law, House Bill 58 would allow homeschool students to participate in public school extracurricular activities for the school in their respective district.

  • This is a copy of a message I sent to Judge Riley and all of the Spencer County magistrates who have public email addresses.  (Squire Rogers has no email address available.  Do you, my fellow citizens, agree or disagree?  

    Either way, let your voices be heard by contacting your magistrates or judge, or by attending a fiscal court meeting.

    Here is my opinion on various issues facing the county:

  • As director of the Spencer County Animal Shelter in Taylorsville, I would like to emphasize that the shelter report that aired on WAVE 3 last week was not to show that we have a poorly run shelter: indeed, it was quite the opposite and probably the reason there wasn’t more coverage about our shelter. Being listed as one of the neediest shelters in Kentucky means just that: we NEED more to run a shelter that adheres more closely to state shelter regulations. If you watched closely, our shelter looked better than any other shelter in the news segment.
     

  • Despite the snow flurries and the brief return to winter weather, this is a great week in Kentucky. It’s March Madness and this special time of the year offers a brief respite from all the political talk and hate and debate that seems to dominate the airwaves and social media these days.

  • We are in the final stretch of the Regular Session and the House has been hard at work to better Kentucky, not only on bills from our own chamber, but reviewing Senate bills as well. With just a few legislative days remaining, the brisk pace can be expected right up until the clock runs out. We passed several measures this week, dealing with multiple issues facing the Commonwealth.   

  • Mike Woodford has been a busy man for several months as he has labored to help the Levee Commission prepare emergency plans that are required as part of the levee recertification process.

    Last week, he held a meeting with local officials to help iron out the process of sandbagging and evacuations in the event of a severe flood event in Taylorsville, and before that, he spent untold hours researching maps, flood plans and past records needed to help put together a plan of action should the waters ever breach the floodwall.

  • I didn’t know Joseph Sheeley, but I knew some of his family. I knew some of his friends and some of the adults who interacted with him daily at school. And like so many others in this community who never had the privilege of knowing him personally, I’ve still been grieving his loss.

    Through social media posts, interviews with those who knew him, stories I’ve heard and a video that was made to honor him after his tragic death Saturday night, I feel like I’ve gotten to know him over the last 48 hours. This kind of story just breaks my heart.

  • You will often notice that bills coming through the Kentucky General Assembly put people first. That person may be a child, a worker in need of a job, or a young adult living in a community plagued by criminal activity and drug abuse. All are important in the eyes of Kentucky lawmakers.

  • Late nights, packed committee meetings, and heated debate marked the fifth week of the 2017 Session. The Senate is quickly passing the remaining Senate bills out and receiving bills from the House for consideration. While there were some contested issues, the Senate conducted itself in a bipartisan fashion. We wasted little time this week and passed over 40 pieces of legislation including:

    • Senate Bill 9, redistricting of judicial districts in order to better align caseloads with current census data;

  • The Catlettsburg, KY police department is removing decals from their cruisers that featured a popular comic book logo known as “The Punisher” and the words “Blue Lives Matter,” following some outcry, mostly from people outside of the community.

    The logo features a menacing looking skull and has been adopted by some military units. It’s based on a comic book character who is known to use threats, kidnapping, torture and murder as he seeks revenge. In short, he is a vigilante.

  • Last year, during my visit to the drug treatment program at Roeder Correctional Complex in LaGrange, Kentucky, I met a young man there named Joe. He was smart and articulate, the son of a police officer and a father himself. He was also a heroin abuser, whose addiction had driven him to rob banks to pay for his drugs. On the day that I met him, Joe had joined the drug treatment program at Roeder, and was clear-eyed, reflective, and focused on turning his life around. He was anxious to rejoin society, find a good job, and get back to taking care of his family.

  • The pace in Frankfort has picked up substantially, as another week of committee meetings, ceremonies, and floor votes have gone by. We have passed a variety of bipartisan legislation that will go far in increasing government transparency and caring for the most vulnerable among us.