• While summer usually means time away from work at the beach or mountains, those of us in the General Assembly will begin gathering in Frankfort next month to begin our annual Interim Session.

    For those of you who might not be familiar with Kentucky’s Interim Session, over the next six months, beginning in June, joint committees of House and Senate members will gather to discuss various issues that were either taken up during the last Regular Session, or those that could become major points of discussion during the 2016 Regular Session scheduled for next January.

  • In our Republic, our vote is our voice. With our vote, we speak our mind, we express our values and exercise our convictions. Voting is the heartbeat that pumps liberty through the veins of our nation. Anything that tarnishes the integrity of a single vote should be viewed as a threat to liberty.

  • Each Memorial Day, since 1988, members of the 2nd Platoon of Kilo Company Marines, join together. They say Memorial Day isn’t about them. It’s about honoring those who didn’t come home. They reunite, share a few beers, have a cigar, catch up and talk about their families. They reminisce.

  • One of our greatest presidents and Kentucky native, Abraham Lincoln, once said of our country, “America will never be destroyed from the outside.  If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.”  That quote comes to mind as we gather in the coming days to honor those who have fought and died in wars foreign and domestic to continue to guarantee the freedom that makes us the envy of other nations and their people around the world.

  • It’s been said that following the legislative process is akin to watching sausage being made. It’s not the most appealing thing to witness.

    However, when that sausage sits on the same plate as our farm fresh eggs, then it’s a stark reminder that we need to pay closer attention.

  • In six days, May 19th, the registered Republican voters in Kentucky will have the duty to choose which one of four candidates is the best qualified to win the November 2015 general election, and is best qualified to serve as Kentucky’s next Governor. Matt Bevin produced his written plan-- “Blueprint for a Better Kentucky” upon entering the race.

  • Spencer County is not the city. In fact, most people who have chosen to move to Spencer County have fled the noise, the crowds, the congestion and the restrictive tentacles of metro government explicity because it is NOT the city.

    Imagine their surprise then, when learning that in this rural, country atmosphere, bureaucrats have moved to limit homeowners to having just one chicken per acre.

    We realize that doesn’t immediately impact most residents. The only chicken most of us own rests frozen in the freezer.

  • The most inspiring message I witnessed during last Thursday’s National Day of Prayer observance in downtown Taylorsville did not come from a song, a proclamation, or even one of the prayers delivered by one of several local ministers.

    Instead, in came in the form of a Sara Lee bread truck. The driver was no doubt in the middle of a busy day on a busy route, but as he neared the courthouse and saw dozens of people out front, heads bowed in prayer, he stopped the truck and he waited.

  • Appeasement, while intended to avoid conflict, often only delays and intensifies it. It’s a lesson taught by history, both distant and recent, but a lesson obviously not learned.

    We saw appeasement in Ferguson, Missouri, last year when riots erupted following a false narrative describing a police shooting. The media continued to push the “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” lie that many news outlets have finally admitted was erroneous. That lie only stoked the flames and fueled the fires that set that small St. Louis suburb ablaze.

  • Before returning to the Spencer Magnet last month, I spent seven years working for a nonprofit whose mission was to provide healing and hope to abused and neglected children.

    At Sunrise Children’s Services (formerly Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children), there were constant reminders of young lives scarred by mistreatment. The stories were horrific.

    There were children who had been kept in cages and given dogfood to eat. Kids old enough for middle school who had been hidden in secret, never learning their colors and shapes, let alone numbers and letters.

  • There is a legitimate way to increase Spencer County’s income and increase safety within the community at the same time.

    We can do this by taking advantage of the fair number of drivers who are “want-a-bee” NASCAR racers that experiment on HWY 44. Some indeed are probably pretty good because most of them seem to manage to get home each evening. But--on the other hand--you can pity us poor average guys who have to mix it up dodging them while “put-putting” along at our boring rate of 55 MPH.

  • Last week’s story on Sheriff Buddy Stump’s request for new vehicles stated that he was requesting the purchase of a cruiser and a pickup truck. While Stump submitted a bid sheet listing prices for four vehicles – two trucks and two cars for the purpose of comparison, he said he was only requesting one vehicle at the present time, preferably a pickup truck.

  • Do you remember your first date with your spouse? How about when you met your in-laws for the first time? If so, you know the value of a first impression.
    Perhaps you’ve interviewed people for a job, or your daughter brought home a boy for the first time - and once again, that initial greeting can send a powerful message.
    It’s the same with a community.

  • Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell, who won re-election overwhelmingly last November, has been taking quite a pummeling from the left of late for daring to actually fulfill a campaign promise. Specifically, McConnell said he would take the fight to the Obama administration in its war on coal, which has already cost thousands of jobs in Kentucky.

  • George Washington was a Federalist and the first Congress was a majority Federalist assembly. That included both the Senate and House. The Federalists appointed the first Supreme Court and they began to form a Federalist leaning government by their interpretations of the Constitution. A Federalist is one who wants a strong Federal government with little or no States or Individual Rights. The Federalists formed the government that we now have and little has changed.

  • Have you ever had that overwhelming feeling of walking into a situation where so much needs to be done that you don’t know where to start? Perhaps you feel it when you need to clean out the garage or attic or after a wind storm knocks down trees and limbs all over your yard.
    You stand back, scan the area and dread the time, effort and energy that will be required for the task. However, five minutes into the job, and the dread slowly dissipates as you begin to see progress.

  • The controversial religious freedom law in Indiana and other states was about much more than whether a baker, florist, or even pizzeria can be forced to cater to a gay wedding. Opponents of the law attempt to reduce the issue to those simple terms in an effort to frame it solely as a matter of discrimination. The strategy is to create victims and villains.
    However, it’s not about discrimination, but about discretion – which Webster defines as “the freedom to act or judge on one’s own.” These laws are about protecting our freedom of choice.

  • Kentucky junior U.S. Sen. Rand Paul made it official Tuesday — he is running for president.
    “I am running for president to return our country to the principles of liberty and limited government,” Paul announced on his website, randpaul.com.
    Paul, a freshman senator and ophthalmologist who made his home in Bowling Green more than 20 years ago, was scheduled to personally announce his bid for the White House at noon Tuesday at the Galt House.

  • We often speak of our sense of “Community” in Spencer County and it was a keyword in the most recent election. Your newspaper is vital to maintaining and increasing our sense of community.
    One of the ways of helping us to know our neighbors is your weekly report of property purchases. Sometimes you show the new neighbor’s names and address (most helpful) but oftentimes their address is omitted or simply stated as a property in Deed Book such as Page such. This way of reporting is rather pointless.