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Opinion

  • Sunday evening, I attended two church services, both of which were the telling of the Christmas story through music and drama.

    The first was told through the voices of small children at Spencer Christian Church, a performance my wife helped direct that required rehearsals that began months ago.

  • I’d like to address Charlotte Caple’s letter to the editor on December 2nd concerning the “inaccurate” information on the flier she received, alerting neighbors of additional subsidized housing planned for our area.

  • I received a flier in my paper box this week. I absolutely disagree with this.

    My daughter and her two sons live in Taylorsville Place. Not only parents with children, but single parents and senior citizens live there.

    It is a very well-maintained place. There are no problems there.

    I live in River Heights and there has been no problem here with this apartment complex.

    Not all the people are low income. Some pay the full amount of rent. It is inspected very often for the way people maintain their property and anything that is wrong.

  • There’s been a lot of backlash over proposals to enforce photo identification for voting, and most of it is hyperbolic whining of those who might benefit from lessening the integrity at the ballot.

    However, Kentucky voters have had a right to feel disenfranchised over the years due to the late date on the calendar on which they participate in presidential primaries.

  • Will December 11th mark another déjà vu moment for Congress? This looming deadline is the day by which Congress must once again fund the federal government for the upcoming fiscal year.

    As in past years, Congress has failed to follow its own internal process (known as “regular order”). The House has so far passed only 6 of 12 bills necessary to fund the government, while the Senate has passed only one. So, we will likely be forced to have an up-or-down vote in December on a “kitchen sink” funding bill that crams everything into one.

  • When counting our blessings, Spencer Countians should never overlook their many friends and neighbors who so often give of themselves and their resources to help others in need.

    We live in a very caring community. Sometimes we see it driving home, when a man pulls over to help someone with a flat tire or dead battery in the pouring rain.

    Sometimes we see it in our schools, when a teacher spends her own money to make sure the children in her class all have the materials they need.

  • On Thursday, we’ll stuff our turkeys, then stuff ourselves full of holiday food before settling in for some football, visits with relatives and a wide array of other traditions that might vary from family to family.

    Thanksgiving is a far cry from that harvest festival among the Pilgrims and Indians we learned about in school so many years ago. But what does remain, is the fact that the day is a reminder that we should be grateful.

  • WHEREAS, it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favour; and Whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me “to recommend to the people of the United States a DAY OF PUBLIC THANKSGIVING and PRAYER, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness:”

  • The 2016 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly is fast approaching. The legislature will convene on January 5, 2016, and the 60-day session must be completed by April 15. The primary responsibility during this session is adopting a two year general and road fund budget going into effect on July 1, 2016. During the 2016 session, along with my fellow legislators, we will also consider approximately 1,000 pieces of proposed legislation. In a typical session, only 10-15 percent of proposed bills are actually signed into law.

  • The Bevin transition team responded to Governor Steve Beshear’s defense of his health reform efforts last week. In a statement from Jessica Ditto, Communications Director for Governor-Elect Bevin’s Transition Team reacted to Beshear’s press conference.

    “Governor-Elect Bevin’s immediate priority is forming the new administration and preparing the executive budget.

  • Making an evidence-based case that Kentucky needs to continue its transformative and nation-leading health reform efforts, Gov. Steve Beshear joined health-care advocates last week to talk about steady improvements in noted health measures as well as the hugely positive economic impact for the medical industry.

  • As Christmas draws near, Kentuckians are gearing up for the shopping season. Many shoppers plan their Thanksgiving weekend around Black Friday advertisements while others scope out the latest online deals for Cyber Monday.

    But there is another option – shop local. With national initiatives such as Small Business Saturday on Nov. 28 and statewide initiatives like Kentucky Proud, more shoppers are thinking about the benefits of keeping their hard-earned money within their own communities.

  • Governor-Elect Matt Bevin hasn’t even been sworn in and he’s already mentioning the groups he is going to stick it to such as the poorest of the poor–over 400,000 Kentucky people who didn’t have insurance and now have it thanks to President Obama and Governor Breshear. He has said he will overrule Governor Breshear by giving millions of tax dollars to the Noah’s Ark theme park who is limiting hiring to Christians.

  • Imagine your child bringing home a letter from school written as follows:

    Dear Parent,

    This is to inform you that as of next week, sixteen children from the Bellwood medical camp will be enrolling at your child’s school.

  • Here we go again. The Obama Administration has fired its latest salvo in the War on Coal by publishing the final version of its so-called “Clean Power Plan”—regulations that would effectively shut down most coal-fired power plants and prevent new ones from being built.

  • I’ve often had sympathy for television weather forecasters who go out on a limb each and every day to tell you what the weather is going to be.

    How we dress often depends on whether it’s going to be hot or cold, calm or breezy, wet or dry. More often than not, they get it right, or at least close. However, on the few occasions when they are wrong, it seems we take out our ire on them mercilessly.

  • If you have not yet watched the acceptance speech of Governor-Elect Matt Bevin, I urge all Kentuckians to google it online and be witness to the beginning of a new bright future for our state. We no longer have to settle for ranking 4th from the bottom economically. There are companies that want to come to Kentucky, bringing good jobs, but our poor business climate has been the stumbling block. Finally, we have a business leader, with an entrepreneurial spirit and the experience to bring our state out of the stale, old pattern we’ve been stuck in for so long.

  • Saturday morning’s Veteran’s Day celebration in downtown Taylorsville was a meaningful reminder that the freedoms we enjoy in this nation did not come easily, and are not preserved cheaply.

    People enter military service for a variety of reasons. In years past, it often was involuntary, through a draft, and dutiful Americans stood up, put their lives on hold and served their nation when asked.

  • I can’t describe the emotion I felt when I learned of the state retirement system board’s decision to keep its current executive director, extend his contract for 30 months and award him a 25-percent raise – to $215,000 annually.

  • Former President Jimmy Carter recently said of President Obama’s foreign policy that America’s “influence and prestige and respect in the world is probably lower than it was six or seven years ago,” adding “…I can’t think of many nations in the world where we have a better relationship now than when he took over.” Having recently returned from Israel, Jordan, Iraq, and Afghanistan with Congressman Andy Barr and several of my Senate colleagues, it’s clear that Carter’s critique is devastatingly accurate.