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Opinion

  • A lot of things can happen in four years: a teenager completes high school, a young adult earns an engineering degree, a president serves a full term, the Olympics gear up for another go. But can Spencer County get light poles installed in that time frame?
    Apparently not.
    According to our very own archives, UPS donated several massive light poles to the county in September 2009. Those poles were unloaded at Ray Jewell Park and those poles lay in that same location four years later.

  • As a journalist, even I know there are certain questions that shouldn’t be asked and certain things that shouldn’t be said.
    Let it be known that these questions differ from the ones that people don’t want to answer — you should always ask those. But I digress.
    “How many months?” Or, “when is the baby due?”
    “Are you old enough to get married?”

  • Many years ago, there was a television documentary that was broadcast called “This is Your Life.” The series first ran from the early 1950s to 1961 and it was revived for a couple of years in the early ‘70s, eventually fizzling out with a few shows in the early ‘80s. The essence of the show was that the host would surprise a guest and then he would take them on a stroll down memory lane in front of the audience.

  • Last Tuesday afternoon, a few hours after we finished the pages for last week’s newspaper, but before it was time to go home for the day, one of those calls came across our scanner.
    And when I say one of those calls, I mean the one reporters don’t like to hear, and, even less, the one they don’t like to cover.

  • Will Spencer County ever have a fireworks show to celebrate Independence Day? I thought the answer was finally a resounding “Yes!” last week when all signs pointed to a night of fun at the lake on July 6. But Mother Nature had other plans.
    Inches and inches and feet of other plans.
    Thursday through Saturday, Spencer County, along with many other nearby areas, received so much rain we could have started to build an ark.

  • Here are two statistics that disturb me, and should startle everyone:
    • African Americans in Kentucky are six times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana possession.
    • While African Americans are 13 percent of the total U.S. population, they make up 37 percent of the prison population.
    What is the reason for these disparities?

  • For the past two years, we’ve harped on anyone we could possibly blame for not putting together a July Fourth celebration worthy of the wonderful citizens of Taylorsville and Spencer County.
    So, this year, it’s only fair to heap credit where it’s due.
    On Saturday, two days after Independence Day, our citizens will have an opportunity to gather together and celebrate their freedom with a fireworks show to boot.

  • We are now into the “lazy, hazy days of summer,” according to the song. We have many issues we need to address so we can forget lazy. First up, we have been very lucky to have been approved for a grant from the Kentucky Pride Fund to purchase a new heavy duty baler for the recycling center. The new baler will help compact cardboard and paper products into tighter bales and create more bales in less time.

  • Contrary to the liberal media’s opinion that the Tea Party has passed it’s prime, the event in Washington D.C. last Wednesday proved otherwise. Both the east lawn and west lawn of the U.S. Capitol building were covered with thousands of patriotic Americans exercising their First Amendment Freedom of Speech.
    The topic of east lawn speakers was the “Gang of 8” immigration bill (a secure border was promised with the 1986 Amnesty bill, but never delivered — now we have untold millions here illegally).

  • The use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others — that’s the definition of bullying and it has been all too familiar in Spencer County these days.
    While we know this is a pressing issue in our schools, the bullying we’d rather address today comes straight from our elected officials.
    Over the last 10 days, members of our staff have been told the following from those “trusted” with serving this community:

  • We have completed our Spring Roadside Litter Abatement Drive with the largest number of groups to date. With almost 1,900 bags of litter contained, we can feel sure that for a short time, at least, our county is more presentable to visitors.
    Our county tire amnesty held in May netted 1,580 scrap tires that will not end up in Salt River or Brashears Creek, etc. We have had good luck to date in having the cooperation of our citizens when we have a cleanup/takeback event of any type.

  • There is a definite divide between what would normally be classified as an expense as opposed to what is considered an investment, and your accountant would advise you to keep the two separated when it comes time to file your taxes. However, when it comes to advertising, it is my contention that the lines blur and even intermingle between the two in many regards, and I will gladly explain how I’ve come to this way of thinking.

  • A move by one of Chicago’s largest daily newspapers sent shock-waves through the journalism world recently — the Chicago Sun-Times laid off its entire photography department.
    For those who are not as up-to-date on the field as those of us who are in it, photographers are a luxury that typically only larger newspapers can afford.
    I’ve worked for two newspapers who had their own employees who were strictly devoted to photography — my college paper, The Kentucky Kernel, and The State Journal in Frankfort, both of which are dailies.

  • Readers will have a new writer for the Spencer Magnet, but not for long. I’m the summer intern and will be spending 10 weeks in Taylorsville working at the paper.
    I’m 20 years old and will be starting my third year at the University of Kentucky this fall. With Spencer County’s relative close proximity to Louisville and the Cardinals, I only hope that won’t be held against me.

  • Last Thursday evening, I had the opportunity to witness greatness on a number of levels.
    The Spencer Magnet was invited to attend and cover a “Night at the Museum” at Spencer County Middle School, pictures from which can be found in our B section this week.
    Art Teacher Stacy LaRue explained to our staff that each of her advanced art students and art club members would have a table of their work set up in the school’s cafeteria to display to friends and family.

  • While some progress has been made regarding teen driver safety, motor vehicle crashes remain the number one killer of teenagers between the ages of 15 and 20. In 2012, nationally there were more than 25,200 crashes involving drivers under the age of 21. These crashes resulted in more than 8,000 injuries and 95 fatalities.

  • This week I had the pleasure of writing a story about a man that I vividly remember as a child — Spencer County Elementary School Principal Dale Kleinjan.

  • When I was a kid, we did not have a large amount of waste to dispose of. The top of a tin can was saved to use when a mouse would chew a hole in the floor or baseboard of a building. The can was saved to store small items such as tacks. What was paper waste got burned. Everybody had a hollow or sinkhole to dispose of the unusable waste.

  • Right around a decade ago – yes, that makes me feel old; you’ll see why – if you had stumbled into Bell County High School, you could have seen yours truly as Alice in “Alice in Wonderland” or Helena in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”
    Some of the nights spent rehearsing and putting together props are some of my best memories from my senior year of high school.

  • NOTE: Editor Shannon Brock and Freelancer John Shindlebower each tackle a side of the question, "Was NBA player Jason Collins 'courageous' in announcing publicly that he is gay?"