.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • I read with some interest the recent article on the radios because I had attended a number of the Fiscal Court meetings during the decision making and installation process of the current county system.

  • As we usher in the New Year and the 150th regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly, I’m honored to represent your district. This will be my 13th year in the state legislature.

    During even-year sessions, we are required to pass a two-year budget for the commonwealth. It’s a tall order to pass a budget during even the most prosperous of times, but we’re committed to rolling up our sleeves and working together to adopt a fiscally responsible spending plan that addresses Kentucky’s most pressing needs. It’s a goal we all share.

  • All politics are local.

    While here in Spencer County, the debate rages about funding the Sheriff’s Office in order to continue their current level of 24/7 coverage, in Washington, our President is forgoing debate and was planning Tuesday to use his executive pen to decree new gun control measures.

    Both issues relate to the safety of you and I in our homes.

  • From failing pension systems for state employees and teachers to what should be done about Medicaid expansion, state Rep. James Tipton knows full well there is plenty of work that needs to be done in Frankfort.

    He also knows to be a part of that work, he must get re-elected next November.

    Tipton, a Republican from Taylorsville who won the 53rd District seat in the state House of Representatives last year, filed recently for re-election and last week spelled out what he says are the state’s major issues and how he hopes to solve them.

  • When the 2016 session of the General Assembly convenes on January 5, the unfunded liability crisis facing our Public Pension Systems will be front and center.

  • I do not like Donald Trump as a presidential candidate. I find him arrogant, crude and ill-prepared to assume the role of President and Commander-in-Chief.

    I do like Trump’s candidacy however, in the sense that it should open a nation’s eyes to the follies of political correctness.
    Love or loathe him, Trump speaks in a language that America understands. He’s blunt, brash and straight-to-the-point. Americans have always liked that, although our politicians have more often developed a way of weaving their words into a tangled web of ambiguity.

  • As we get ready to close out 2015, let me wish you and your family a happy New Year!

    It’s time again for members of the Kentucky General Assembly to meet for a 60-day legislative session that is frequently called a “budget session.” During this time, my colleagues and I will work to develop a two-year budget for state government. We will also discuss other issues important to Kentuckians including jobs, economic development, education and health care.

  • In the early spring, Kentucky received a substantial amount of rain causing many creeks and streams to go over their banks. Many acres and roads were flooded.

    Veech Road had a major landslide. A portion of the road fell 100 feet into Plum Creek. At least 25 trees and tons of earth and rock fell. The road was impassable.

  • I’ve often wondered what the editor of the Bethlehem Star Gazette was doing on that night more than 2,000 years ago when an event happened in his little town that would forever change the world.

    Obviously, he may have sent out a reporter to cover the great influx of people arriving for the approaching census.

    Obviously, the inns were full, so I’m sure the local diners and taverns were doing brisk business as well. So a story concerning the economic impact would certainly be appropriate.

  • As we approach the holidays I would like to take this opportunity to say Merry Christmas to each of you and to your family. My wish is that you can take time out of your busy schedules to enjoy family and celebrate the reason for the season.

    The holidays provide a brief break before the 2016 General Assembly. The debate of how to address the Kentucky employees’ and teachers’ retirement systems combined estimated $25 billion in unfunded liabilities will likely dominate the session as legislators work to pass the state’s next 24-month budget.

  • In this week’s Magnet, you’ll notice our entire B-section is made up of letters to Santa, written by young children from both elementary schools in Spencer County. This has become an annual tradition with our newspaper, one we know many of our readers enjoy browsing through.

  • Cha-ching. That’s the sound that rings from the chambers of local government whenever a new proposal to sell alcohol is brought up for discussion. It jingled repeatedly last Tuesday during the Spencer County Fiscal Court meeting when Judge-Executive John Riley and County Attorney Kenneth Jones spoke of a change to the county’s ordinance that would allow alcohol sales by the drink on Sundays.

  • As the fog lifted on Dec. 8 for the inaugural celebrations in Frankfort, I was reminded of the smooth transition of power we enjoy in our Commonwealth – and nation.

    In a fitting tribute to that transition Gov. Steve Beshear participated in the parade honoring the person replacing him as chief executive of Kentucky. In addition, former governors Paul E. Patton, Brereton Jones, Martha Layne Collins and John W. Brown, Jr., joined in the parade.

  • U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made the following remarks on the Senate floor Tuesday regarding the President’s insufficient plan to defeat ISIL:
    Monday evening President Obama addressed the Nation concerning the threat ISIL poses to our people.

    Unfortunately, the American people did not hear of a strategy or plan to defeat and destroy this terrorist army. Instead, they heard a restatement of a military campaign crafted to contain ISIL within Iraq and Syria.

  • Sunday evening, I attended two church services, both of which were the telling of the Christmas story through music and drama.

    The first was told through the voices of small children at Spencer Christian Church, a performance my wife helped direct that required rehearsals that began months ago.

  • I’d like to address Charlotte Caple’s letter to the editor on December 2nd concerning the “inaccurate” information on the flier she received, alerting neighbors of additional subsidized housing planned for our area.

  • I received a flier in my paper box this week. I absolutely disagree with this.

    My daughter and her two sons live in Taylorsville Place. Not only parents with children, but single parents and senior citizens live there.

    It is a very well-maintained place. There are no problems there.

    I live in River Heights and there has been no problem here with this apartment complex.

    Not all the people are low income. Some pay the full amount of rent. It is inspected very often for the way people maintain their property and anything that is wrong.

  • There’s been a lot of backlash over proposals to enforce photo identification for voting, and most of it is hyperbolic whining of those who might benefit from lessening the integrity at the ballot.

    However, Kentucky voters have had a right to feel disenfranchised over the years due to the late date on the calendar on which they participate in presidential primaries.

  • Will December 11th mark another déjà vu moment for Congress? This looming deadline is the day by which Congress must once again fund the federal government for the upcoming fiscal year.

    As in past years, Congress has failed to follow its own internal process (known as “regular order”). The House has so far passed only 6 of 12 bills necessary to fund the government, while the Senate has passed only one. So, we will likely be forced to have an up-or-down vote in December on a “kitchen sink” funding bill that crams everything into one.