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Opinion

  • Use local assets to better community

    I just wanted to respond to Ashley Scoby’s editorial in the Aug. 14 issue of the Magnet.
    Ashley gave us invaluable insight into some of the problems with this county. Her editorial was not mean-spirited, but was a concise appraisal and we should pay attention.
    In a few short months, she clearly saw the good and bad of Spencer County. She couldn’t have been more to the point and I admire her honesty. It is up to us to take it from there.

  • Three accidents occurred on Saturday within eight hours of each other and probably within fewer than eight feet of each other.
    Two motorcycles and an SUV fell victim to a sharp drop-off along Ky. 44 West inside of city limits heading out of Taylorsville.
    This roadway — the twisty, turning Ky. 44 — has been on the state’s “schedule” for years. Several phases of the project have been completed, but none of those phases entails construction or implementation.

  • After nearly 18 months, one lawsuit and one plan declared unconstitutional, the House of Representatives and the Senate finally passed a redistricting plan this past week during a Special Session in Frankfort.
    Given all the past history of redistricting stretching back to the Kentucky Supreme Court’s decision to throw out the plan that passed in 2012, it was somewhat refreshing that we could come together and pass a plan that for the most part passed along bipartisan lines.

  • Hello, I’m Jimmy Higdon, and I am honored to be your new state Senator for Spencer County.

  • Back in the early days of human activity, the earth was covered with about 18 billion acres of forest lands with trees of various types. Today, that has shrunk to less than 11 billion acres.
    Wood in general helped create civilization as we know it today. Even when building with brick, concrete and steel, a lot of wood is involved in each project. We have been exposed to using wood in so many different ways, we have lost the sense of its importance in our world today.

  • To many, August signifies the end of summer, the start of a new school year or the last full month without football.
    However, to a subset of the population, namely journalists and those serving on or with taxing entities, it signifies the beginning of tax season — when cities, counties and taxing districts set their property tax rates for the following year.

  • Our young ones again face the challenges of absorbing all the knowledge necessary to survive in our modern world.
    For us old people, the challenge is finding the way to grab their attention. Today’s world is a very fast-paced, high-charged distracting environment. To make matters worse, new products are brought to market before you have learned to use the item it replaces. That tends to create a “throw-away” society.

  • I came into Taylorsville as the new girl, not knowing a soul within Spencer County and having no horse in the constant political race.
    Arriving with a clean slate allowed me to see the county through clear lenses not fogged by family history, personal squabbles or long-standing rumors.

  • A lot of things can happen in four years: a teenager completes high school, a young adult earns an engineering degree, a president serves a full term, the Olympics gear up for another go. But can Spencer County get light poles installed in that time frame?
    Apparently not.
    According to our very own archives, UPS donated several massive light poles to the county in September 2009. Those poles were unloaded at Ray Jewell Park and those poles lay in that same location four years later.

  • As a journalist, even I know there are certain questions that shouldn’t be asked and certain things that shouldn’t be said.
    Let it be known that these questions differ from the ones that people don’t want to answer — you should always ask those. But I digress.
    “How many months?” Or, “when is the baby due?”
    “Are you old enough to get married?”

  • Many years ago, there was a television documentary that was broadcast called “This is Your Life.” The series first ran from the early 1950s to 1961 and it was revived for a couple of years in the early ‘70s, eventually fizzling out with a few shows in the early ‘80s. The essence of the show was that the host would surprise a guest and then he would take them on a stroll down memory lane in front of the audience.

  • Last Tuesday afternoon, a few hours after we finished the pages for last week’s newspaper, but before it was time to go home for the day, one of those calls came across our scanner.
    And when I say one of those calls, I mean the one reporters don’t like to hear, and, even less, the one they don’t like to cover.

  • Will Spencer County ever have a fireworks show to celebrate Independence Day? I thought the answer was finally a resounding “Yes!” last week when all signs pointed to a night of fun at the lake on July 6. But Mother Nature had other plans.
    Inches and inches and feet of other plans.
    Thursday through Saturday, Spencer County, along with many other nearby areas, received so much rain we could have started to build an ark.

  • Here are two statistics that disturb me, and should startle everyone:
    • African Americans in Kentucky are six times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana possession.
    • While African Americans are 13 percent of the total U.S. population, they make up 37 percent of the prison population.
    What is the reason for these disparities?

  • For the past two years, we’ve harped on anyone we could possibly blame for not putting together a July Fourth celebration worthy of the wonderful citizens of Taylorsville and Spencer County.
    So, this year, it’s only fair to heap credit where it’s due.
    On Saturday, two days after Independence Day, our citizens will have an opportunity to gather together and celebrate their freedom with a fireworks show to boot.

  • We are now into the “lazy, hazy days of summer,” according to the song. We have many issues we need to address so we can forget lazy. First up, we have been very lucky to have been approved for a grant from the Kentucky Pride Fund to purchase a new heavy duty baler for the recycling center. The new baler will help compact cardboard and paper products into tighter bales and create more bales in less time.

  • Contrary to the liberal media’s opinion that the Tea Party has passed it’s prime, the event in Washington D.C. last Wednesday proved otherwise. Both the east lawn and west lawn of the U.S. Capitol building were covered with thousands of patriotic Americans exercising their First Amendment Freedom of Speech.
    The topic of east lawn speakers was the “Gang of 8” immigration bill (a secure border was promised with the 1986 Amnesty bill, but never delivered — now we have untold millions here illegally).

  • The use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others — that’s the definition of bullying and it has been all too familiar in Spencer County these days.
    While we know this is a pressing issue in our schools, the bullying we’d rather address today comes straight from our elected officials.
    Over the last 10 days, members of our staff have been told the following from those “trusted” with serving this community:

  • We have completed our Spring Roadside Litter Abatement Drive with the largest number of groups to date. With almost 1,900 bags of litter contained, we can feel sure that for a short time, at least, our county is more presentable to visitors.
    Our county tire amnesty held in May netted 1,580 scrap tires that will not end up in Salt River or Brashears Creek, etc. We have had good luck to date in having the cooperation of our citizens when we have a cleanup/takeback event of any type.

  • There is a definite divide between what would normally be classified as an expense as opposed to what is considered an investment, and your accountant would advise you to keep the two separated when it comes time to file your taxes. However, when it comes to advertising, it is my contention that the lines blur and even intermingle between the two in many regards, and I will gladly explain how I’ve come to this way of thinking.