.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • I read the Magnet’s report of the Fiscal Court’s meeting with some wonderment. Maybe it’s just me but here are a couple of observations that contribute to the ‘wonderment’ of ‘What the heck is happening?’

    We have a Judge Executive who admitted that he could not read the budget in my presence. This contributes to the ‘wonderment’.

  • In about three months, Spencer County taxpayers will be receiving their tax bills, meaning local governments and taxing districts are now faced with setting tax rates.

    The annual debate over cutting costs or raising taxes is not exclusive to Spencer County, but a discussion had by elected officials at all levels.

  • There’s nothing civil about war, but that doesn’t always have to apply to the political process that seems to grow nastier, meaner and more vile every election cycle.

    In a sense, politics is a war - a war of ideas and philosophies. I’ve never been a fan of those who say compromise and bipartisanship are always the answer. Politics are partisan by nature, and that’s a good thing. Despite what’s taught in this post-modern world, there remains a difference between right and wrong, good and evil, and often politics are divided on those very lines.

  • I have a question for the Fair Board concerning the baby and youth show.

    Why would they let people from Spencer County (and they also work here with the public), be the judges for the show? The judges that I saw actually were talking to one of the mothers of the contestants prior to the starting of the show, and her child won.

  • “Silence in the face of evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act.”
    - Dietrich Bonhoeffer

    In April of 1945, A German pastor named Dietrich Bonhoeffer was hung in a Nazi concentration camp. He’d spent most of the last two years of his life behind bars because he had devoted several years of his life before that speaking against the evil regime of Adolf Hitler.

  • Washington, DC has the bad news blues. Whether it’s Congress passing bills that spend billions of dollars we don’t have, rogue Supreme Court justices ignoring the clear text of the Constitution, or yet another unelected executive branch agency bureaucrat issuing a “regulation” that punishes free enterprise, it often seems that victories for freedom and liberty are rare.

  • Here is some good news for rural Americans who are concerned about the reliability of mail delivery following postal cutbacks for several years: Last week the Senate Appropriations Committee ordered a study of on-time mail delivery outside of the country’s urban areas. The National Newspaper Association, long an advocate on rural postal service issues because many smaller newspapers are delivered through the mail, applauded the study.

  • Washington, DC has the bad news blues. Whether it’s Congress passing bills that spend billions of dollars we don’t have, rogue Supreme Court justices ignoring the clear text of the Constitution, or yet another unelected executive branch agency bureaucrat issuing a “regulation” that punishes free enterprise, it often seems that victories for freedom and liberty are rare.

  • Twice a year, we do a county-wide mailing of the Spencer Magnet. That means every address in the county receives a copy of our newspaper, whether you subscribe or not.

    For many of you, receiving the Magnet is a weekly occurrence. You’ve grown accustomed to opening up your mailbox each week, then opening up the pages to find out what’s happening in your community.

  • For years, the Obama administration and its overzealous bureaucratic regulators at the EPA have waged a war against Kentucky coal jobs, miners, and their families. And I’ve vowed to do all I can to stop them. I’m pleased to report that recently the Senate Appropriations Committee, on which I serve, took an important step towards using Congress’s power of the purse to rein in the agency on several fronts, efforts that should help those not only in the coal industry but also farmers and Kentucky job creators.

  • Growing up in a military family, I was taught to respect a veteran, because they risk their lives to protect us so we could be free.

    So how do we thank them? We put up flags and tombstones. Then we feel good about ourselves, pat each other on the backs. Then what happens? No one remembers to maintain it. And in time, it begins to show its age.

  • This letter is being written to make the public aware of issues that the County and City face on a daily basis. Spencer County has been an agriculture county since the pioneer days. The impounding of Salt River and the creation of Taylorsville Lake in 1982 by the U.S. Corps of Engineers has brought in millions of dollars in needed revenues related to “boating and fishing” activities.

  • Guest Editorial, The Bowling Green Daily News
    While the pretty wrapping paper and multicolored bow appears attractive on the outside, once the Obamacare package is opened, the soaring costs, broken promises and unintended consequences are exposed for all to see.
    In recent days, we have learned about the proposed merger of Kentucky-based Humana and Aetna. There are also reports that Anthem and Cigna Corp. have rekindled merger talks.

  • Americans crave their independence, or at least we claim to. Earlier this month, we celebrated 239 years of independence with parades, concerts, fireworks and other celebrations. I sometimes wonder how much of it is just show.
    Few people, outside of those who espouse Socialism, will admit to wanting government to do all things for all people. However, increasingly we see a willingness to shirk our own responsibilities if we think the folks in Washington, Frankfort or down at City Hall will do for us, what we ought to be doing for ourselves.

  • It’s shark week. The annual cable television phenomenon started by the Discovery Channel several years ago has become a summer-time tradition that has millions of eyes glued to the screen.

    There’s something fascinating about the man-eating sharks of the deep, especially in light of news reports of them feeding on swimmers in the shallows of the Carolinas.

  • More than four decades ago, seven justices of the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that abortion was the law of the land. Two dissented. The battle is not over.

  • There are two very real dangers posing a threat to Taylorsville. One is a devastating flood. The other is continued inaction by local leaders.