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Opinion

  • When you think you have heard it all, something new or different surfaces to rock the boat.
    This being near the end of the year, we are now in the middle of deer hunting season. I got a call about an issue in a remote area of our county where hunters were taking what they wanted from their kill, and leaving the remainder to rot on the edge of the roadway.
    I see roadkill almost daily on our main roads, but for someone to leave a carcass on the edge of a road after stripping what they wanted to harvest is really stepping over the line.

  • As we approach Thanksgiving, I for one have plenty for which to be thankful and I hope that all of you do, too.
    But the truth of the matter is that there are plenty of our neighbors that could use a hand up this year.
    Luckily for them, there are plenty of opportunities to give and make someone else’s holiday season a little brighter.
    I wrote a column similar to this one last year, but decided to do so again because this year’s needs are no less than last year’s. In fact, they may be greater.

    SCMA Toy Sale

  • In the past several years since I retired from the Taylorsville Police Department, I have at times regretted that I left after only 20 years with them. It is my belief that as we walk this life we only have a certain amount of minutes to do what we were put here to accomplish. So I must ask: “why look back, and why walk those minutes with regrets?”

  • We hear it all the time in Kentucky, especially during presidential election years — “Why should I vote? My vote doesn’t count anyway.”
    And we certainly understand the frustration and the sentiment. During presidential primaries, before Kentuckians even have a chance to have their say, the candidates are selected through the number of elections held in other states prior to ours in May.

  • Perhaps the most level-headed person in the discussion between the city and the county regarding our emergency responders’ radio system actually isn’t an employee or elected official of either the city or the county.
    During a special meeting of the Taylorsville City Commission, Sgt. Scott Herndon, with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife — who is very much a Spencer Countian — reminded us all of why we even care about this radio business in the first place.

  • Probably nobody who walked through the gates of Friday night’s playoff game between Spencer County and Nelson County expected a 56-14 blowout win by the visitors. I know I didn’t, the fans didn’t and I’m quite certain the players in blue didn’t.

  • Last Thursday’s city commission candidate forum went off without a hitch, and we couldn’t be more thankful.
    Our staff, along with the Chamber of Commerce board of directors, put a lot of time and effort into coordinating Thursday’s forum, but we couldn’t have made it happen without you — the citizens and the candidates who attended.
    Thursday was a model night of how, in an ideal world, elected officials would cooperate, collaborate and, let’s just say it, get along.

  • When you read this article, Octoberfest will be a fond memory, and thoughts of Halloween will be dancing through the minds of the younger members of our county.
    I hope everyone had a good time during the fest, because 1 know for a fact a lot of work was expended by a large number of our citizens to make it work.

  • Did Susan King of Mount Eden murder her former boyfriend Kyle “Deanie” Breeden of Shelbyville in 1998?
    That question, which for years haunted investigators and Mr. Breeden’s family, was thought to be at rest in 2008, when Ms. King was sent to prison.
    But now we have our own new set of questions about this case, including not only how the investigation has been handled but also who has a responsibility to ensure that Ms. King in fact did commit this crime.

  • I am proud to share my conservative principles with the State Representative of the 55th District, Kim King.
    A district representative is our connection to state government, and beyond to the federal level, and I believe she represents us well.
    King takes her personal pride of our community into state government, representing us, as Kentucky continues to play its vital role in the nation. King’s principles guide her to attract new business and good paying jobs to our community, as she embraces economic development, not condemns it.

  • On Sept. 22, we had the inaugural Elk Creek Benefit Event with the American Red Cross/Military Disaster Relief Fund.  We have a great community that we live in and we would like to give a special thank you to the following for their donations and help with putting on this successful event.

  • I read in The Spencer Magnet this week that we had a lot more foreclosures. Have we ever asked ourselves what causes all of this bankruptcy and foreclosures? Could it be our tax structure is so high, we do not have enough money to meet our obligations?

  • Are you struggling to make a decision about this year’s election? Let me give you a little information that might help you out. The County Clerk’s race is surely to be a hot topic for the next couple of weeks.

  • Last week, we ran a photo on our sports pages that showcased the “water girls” for the Spencer County High School football team. The photo was labeled “A team behind the team,” and I erroneously left out the girls’ names from the cutline information.
    You’ll find that same photo in the paper this week with those names included to make good on my mistake. This photo, submitted to us by Spencer Countian Ed Curry, inspired me to give a shout out to some of the team members behind our team here at The Magnet.

  • Parts of Taylorsville are starting to shine lately, and pats on the back are due to be handed out in at least three different places.
    First, how about a high five and a  job well done to the Main Street Phase II contractors, as well as the engineers and Main Street Committee members involved.
    It’s rare for a project that is closely watched by both local and state agencies to finish ahead of deadline. Not to mention an “unofficial” deadline of this past Saturday’s Progressive Dinner.

  • During Monday night’s Fiscal Court meeting, Magistrate Hobert Judd told Judge-Executive Bill Karrer that he wanted to address the court’s “communications from citizens” policy.
    Currently, the policy is that citizens are allowed three minutes to address the court as long as the topic they wish to discuss is on the agenda.
    We’ve addressed our displeasure with this policy, and for the record, we continue to do so.
    Judd recommended the court increase that three-minute window to four or even five minutes.

  • The newspaper business — both small and large papers — has sounded full-throated opposition this past month about a plan by the U.S. Postal Service to purposely entice advertising out of the newspaper so ads can be placed instead with USPS favored stakeholder Valassis Inc., which bought direct mail company ADVO in 2006.

  • Rumors in small towns spread like wildfire, and in some ways, it’s the job of the local newspaper to put those fires out.
    My first case in point is discussed at length in this week’s newspaper. At its last regularly scheduled meeting, the Spencer County Board of Education voted not to allow students to have the junior-senior prom off campus.
    Less than 24 hours after that vote was taken, the word on the street was that the prom had been canceled altogether.

  • We are rapidly approaching fall. We have endured many hot summer days, and some very dry conditions this year. I am putting this on paper while Isaac, the hurricane, is drowning the Northern Gulf Coast in the New Orleans area. They promised us some rain by the upcoming weekend, which happened to be Labor Day Weekend, and we got it.
    If you planned an indoor picnic over the weekend, please remember to recycle all items that can be renewed and reused.

  • After a visit home to the mountains of Bell County, it’s not unusual for me to come back to work and write a column about the need to value our family members and make an effort to see the ones we love more often.
    And trust me, my four-day trip home provided me with plenty of examples to do just that — however, I’ll take a little bit of a different approach this time around.