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Opinion

  • I attended the Fiscal Court meeting on January 17, and was disappointed with the court’s decision to pay for Judge Riley’s legal fees accrued by the attorney he hired.  I listened to the reasoning presented by the judge and members of the court, but disagree with the decision to pay for outside council.  I believe our county attorney is capable of handling this case on his own.

  • Over the next few weeks, many discussions will be had with firearms instructors and citizens across Kentucky regarding constitutional carry.  As you may know Kentucky legislatures have SB7 almost ready to be brought to a  vote. This bill does not change current law of where you can carry only how  you can carry.

    Currently in the State of KY, it is legal to open carry without permit at  the age of 18. Many citizens do at times.  The new law, if passed, would  allow a person to conceal the firearm from view.

  • Come Friday, Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States of America - and there is nothing you or anyone else can do about it.

    That’s not written as a gloat. I’ve never been a Trumpster and I had to eat a plate of deep fried crow in November because I never thought he’d actually win the election to begin with. But I can’t say I’m disappointed with the outcome, even though his impending presidency seems to have divided this country even more than the election.

  • The Elizabethtown Independent School Board recently became the first local education oversight body in Kentucky to express collective hostility toward giving parents the option of a different type of public school experience for their children.

    It passed a resolution claiming a charter-school policy “unilaterally takes critically needed funds from local school districts and redirects them to charter schools, thereby debilitating the significantly underfunded system of funding for public education for all Kentucky schools.”

  • Every day, Kentuckians are reading headlines that Obamacare is a failure. Supporters of Obamacare promised lower costs, but it sent them soaring. They promised families could keep their plans or doctors, but many Kentuckians have seen their options limited. Every year since this law’s passage, a growing number of people in Kentucky and throughout the nation have called for Obamacare’s repeal. A recent poll showed that 8 out of 10 Americans want Obamacare to be significantly changed or replaced.

  • We have noted on this page the similarities between Obamacare and Kentucky’s own failed health insurance “reform” law of 1994. Both laws promised to bring competition to the insurance market. Instead they destroyed it, and premiums soared.

  • New legislation from Frankfort to restrict abortion is welcome news. I know there are many voices who say abortion is strictly a woman’s choice and that men in Frankfort and Washington have no business interfering, but I disagree. Allow me to share something personal.

    Six years ago, I was taking photos at a Spencer County Lady Bears basketball game when my wife phoned me and told me we needed to talk. I could tell it wasn’t good news. My heart sunk a little, but she said she would be out in the parking lot and for me to come out and meet her in the car.

  • Mark Mix, President of the 2.8 million-member National Right to Work Committee, praised the Kentucky Legislature’s passage of the Kentucky Right to Work Bill (HB1), issuing the following statement on the struggle to end forced unionism in the Bluegrass State and encouraging legislators in Missouri and New Hampshire to follow Kentucky’s lead:

    “This is a great day for the hardworking men and women of the Bluegrass State as the House and Senate have now passed the Kentucky Right to Work Bill.

  • Angry labor union members on Saturday said they don’t know how they became public enemy No. 1 in Kentucky’s 2017 legislative session.

    Hundreds of workers in boots and heavy coats poured onto every public floor of the state Capitol to loudly protest final passage of three bills that they say will weaken unions and reduce construction workers’ wages.

    “It’s an attack on the working people,” said Chris Kendall, 44, a member of Local 184 of the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union in Paducah.

  • The Kentucky Chamber applauds Governor Bevin, Senate President Stivers and Speaker Hoover on their leadership to make right to work legislation a reality during the first week of the 2017 General Assembly and thanks all legislators who voted to ensure Kentucky is a state where business wants to locate.

  • Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency provides services for people in Bullitt, Shelby and Spencer counties, and approximately eight years ago, I accepted the position of Executive Director and made Kentucky my new home.   While I was not raised in Spencer County, it certainly reminds me of my home county of Perry County, Indiana—predominantly a farming community with down to earth people who care about their neighbors and are willing to give a helping hand.    

    Now I need to ask our neighbors for support.   

  • Some of your elected officials spent another three and a half hours in a courtroom last week continuing to bicker over how to best fix the mold issue in the sheriff’s office. It’s the second such day they’ve spent an afternoon in front of a judge.

    Is there mold in the office?

    Yes. According to tests and expert witnesses who have testified after walking through the building, there are issues.

  • A number of top celebrities have reportedly declined invitations to perform at the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump later this month. Some conservatives have expressed outrage and anger over what they claim is a lack of respect for the office of the presidency.

    I fully support the right of celebrities to make their own decisions on when and for whom they perform. It’s called freedom of conscience and it’s a right we Americans have had since our Founding Fathers emphasized the importance of individual liberties.

  • As we embark on a new year, we’d like to renew an invitation to you our readers.

    The Spencer Magnet prides itself in being a community newspaper. That means we not only report on what’s going on in this community, we want our paper, especially this “Opinion” page, to be a forum for our community to speak out.

  • Chances are, dozens of families across America will be mourning the loss of a loved one due to intoxicated driving as 2016 fades into 2017.

    According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, an average of 118 traffic fatalities take place nationally over the New Year’s Eve-New Year’s Day holiday, with over 50 percent of those involving drunk drivers.

  • Geologists are concerned that the Dead Sea’s water level is dropping faster than Santa from the North Pole on Christmas Eve.

    Experts estimate the water level in this famous sea separating Israel and Jordan dropped by more than 131 feet since the 1950s and continues to lose more than three feet of water annually.

    It’s not because too much water is somehow flowing out of the Sea of Salt, as it’s known.

  • I want to express my appreciation to you for continuing to allow me to serve as your state representative. I am humbled by the trust shown in me to represent you in Frankfort, and I will continue to work hard to make sure your voice is heard in the Capitol.

  • Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. has introduced the first Judicial Redistricting Plan Kentucky has seen in decades. The Kentucky legislature will consider the plan during the 2017 regular session of the General Assembly. If passed, the plan will take effect in 2022, when all Circuit Court, Family Court and District Court judges are on the ballot.

  • It is hard to believe that the year 2016 is coming to end. With the New Year comes the next session of the Kentucky General Assembly which begins on January 3.

    This year’s session will have 30 legislative days and must be completed by March 31, 2017. There will be many new faces in the legislature with 28 new members in the House of Representatives and two new members in the State Senate.

  • It’s the most wonderful time of the year. That’s what the song says. It’s the message on holiday greeting cards, sappy commercials and is the overriding theme of Christmas specials and movies that seem to have been playing on a loop since before we even finished carving up the Thanksgiving turkey.