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Local News

  • Local historian to be honored

    Tom Watson has long had a love-affair with news. It started when his father was able to tinker with an old radio and reconfigure the inner-workings to allow him to broadcast his voice over the air. That began his interest in broadcasting.

  • Blending past and present

    Spencer County High School threw open its doors last Thursday and invited the community to a preview of the renovation work being completed.

    “It looks incredible,” said Dan Cooper, whose son, Arden, is a 10th grader attending the school.

  • PUBLIC RECORD: District court

    The Honorable Judge Donna Dutton presided over the following cases in District Court on December 9, 2008.

    Civil:

    Capital One Bank v Larry S. Gwinn. Motion to transfer granted.

    Capital One Bank v Marina Pearce. Motion to transfer granted.

    DH Capital Managment Inc. v Aaron J. Shawler. Motion to transfer granted.

    The Honorable Judge Linda Armstrong presided over the following cases in District Court on December 19, 2008.

    Traffic:

  • Foreclosures: Big problem in small towns

    Stand on the courthouse steps long enough and it becomes evident that foreclosures are not only occurring in major cities. According to statistics reported at fiscal court Monday, the number of properties sold at auction in Spencer County has nearly doubled since 2006.

    “In the last three years, we have had 196 families who have lost their homes,” said Magistrate Bill Drury. “Our county needs to take a targeted approach to helping people.”

  • Floodwall failure

    The levee that wraps around the city of Taylorsville stands as a quiet centurion against the rising waters of Brashears Creek and the Salt River. Many within those walls have taken its protection for granted – believing that the 60-year-old floodwall will forever shield both life and property.

  • Five area teens charged by police

    Five teens were arrested at Spencer County schools last week, said Taylorsville Police Chief Toby Lewis, making it one of the busiest weeks on record for the “thinly-stretched” law enforcement unit.

    “The schools do take a lot of our time,” Lewis said. “This was a higher arrest volume than normal. We may make one arrest a week at the school” on average.

    ASSAULT AND TEACHER ABUSE

  • Teachers: Show us results or lower our taxes

    Representing hundreds of teachers that work and pay taxes in the city limits, Ruth Ann Sweazy voiced concerns to Taylorsville city commissioners last week over what she described as a lack of results when it comes to utilizing the $240,000 collected in occupational fees.

    “I do not mind paying any tax as long as I know the money is being used,” said Sweazy to commissioners Thursday night. “It appears maybe the OLT (occupational license tax) was not needed if the projects are not going to be completed. People want to see results.”

  • Shelby landfill will not accept dead animals

    Farmers with dead livestock on their hands will not be able to get rid of them by sending them to the convenience center in Waddy.

    The 109 (solid waste) Board voted last Monday no longer to accept dead livestock at its facility on Kings Highway near Waddy. Citing costs to the county and uncertainty about how to deal with potentially diseased animals, the board voted unanimously to bar farmers from bringing in dead livestock.

    “I just don’t think we should go there,” board chair Don Cubert said.

  • Main Street: Second phase right around the corner

    The second phase of the Main Street renovation project was shifted into drive after Taylorsville City Commissioners approved a design concept last Tuesday night.

    Presenting the design was Main Street Committee Chairman John Shircliffe, who provided commissioners with a glimpse of what the area could look like using several computer-generated drawings. Shircliffe said plans now are to contact private property owners and businesses along the affected area to make sure they are still in agreement with the parking configuration between Main Cross and Jefferson Street.

  • Grand jury indictments

    The following Spencer County Grand Jury indictments were filed February 19, 2009.

    • Troy S. Waldridge, of 108 Railroad Street, was indicted on three drug-related felony charges for an incident that occurred about December 17, 2008. Waldridge faces manufacturing methamphetamine, trafficking and possession of meth and possession of drug parahernalia, a Class A misdemenor.

    • Justin Stahmer, of Louisville, is facing a Class C felony indictment for assault in the second degree for an incident occurring around September 23, 2008 in Spencer County.