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Today's News

  • SCYBA fights for lights

     

  • Court nixes tax hike

    Despite warnings of dire financial times ahead, the Spencer County Fiscal Court Wednesday voted against restoring the county’s insurance premium tax to its original four percent. In a 3-3 vote, one shy of the four required, the court struck down Judge-Executive John Riley’s proposal that he said could have generated an additional $170,000 for the general fund.

  • A lifesaving lesson

     

  • Riley’s proposal to restructure county departments delayed

    Changes could be coming to several departments of county government, but they’ll have to wait until later in the month.
    Spencer County Judge-Executive John Riley Monday morning was prepared to unveil a a restructuring of some parts of county operations, but magistrates moved to hold off on the proposal until everyone was present. Magistrate Collis Rogers was absent from Monday’s meeting due to health reasons.
    While little was said in the meeting about Riley’s plan, it was outlined in the packet that accompanied the agenda.

  • Three indicted on various drug charges

    Three women are facing various drug charges stemming from separate incidents after a Spencer County Grand Jury handed down indictments late last month.

  • Legislators talk pension, state issues

     

  • Court mulls hiking tax

    A hike in the county’s insurance premium tax will be on the agenda at a special meeting of the Spencer County Fiscal Court this morning.
    The item was originally on the agenda for this past Monday’s regular meeting of the court, but magistrates voted to halt discussion of the matter because Magistrate Collis Rogers was absent from the meeting.
    Judge-Executive John Riley introduced the tax hike proposal as a potential means of generating additional revenue for the county.

  • Funding isn’t the main problem with pensions

    “Inadequate funding” is a popular claim often repeated by defenders of the status quo regarding Kentucky’s $65 billion public-pension crisis. However, facts assign a much-larger role to the failure of the retirement systems’ benefit structures to protect the commonwealth against risks and costs of crushing liabilities.

  • House Budget bill funds pensions, education
  • Tuning out Hollywood

    Hollywood celebrated itself Sunday night. They seemingly gather every other week during this time of year for some type of awards show to pat themselves on the back, lecture the common people about politics and values, and generally flaunt their money and looks for the drooling paparazzi.
    Decades ago, Hollywood made attempts to be classy. No doubt they still cornered the market on good looks and high salaries, but they seemed interested in celebrating good stories and good people.