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Today's News

  • Dunning joins Magnet as new staff writer

     

  • Farmers can reduce stress with record-keeping

    Record keeping may not be every farmer’s favorite activity, and probably not the reason someone chooses farming as a career. With time, patience and a commitment to get it done, it can make your financial life a lot less stressful.
    Record keeping doesn’t have to be difficult. It’s a way to keep track of things about your operation that will help you make better long-term decisions. You can use a ledger book or a computer—whatever helps you maintain consistency. Software programs can make your data more meaningful.

  • Is it time to merge counties?

     

  • Candidates file as deadline looms

    As the deadline loomed this week for candidates to file for the 2018 countywide election, several new names were added to the list of those whose name will appear on the ballot, including five new magisterial candidates as of Monday afternoon.
    Incumbent Elk Creek Magistrate Brian Bayers filed his candidacy papers to seek re-election to the fiscal court. Despite the late filing date, Bayers said he didn’t really wrestle over seeking another term.

  • Of course it can happen here

    A small community in Western Kentucky said goodbye to two 15-year-old high school students on Sunday, less than a week after they were shot and killed, allegedly by a fellow student at Marshall County High School.
    The news of the school shooting shook not only that community, but small towns all across Kentucky. Even though the bullets that killed two and injured more than a dozen others were fired more than three hours away, the reality ricocheted here locally as minds immediately began wondering, “Could that happen here?”

  • Bill would allow local governments to increase investment revenue

    Local government entities could have new ways to increase investment revenue under a bill that passed the House and is awaiting attention in the state Senate.
    Most local governments now rely on investments such as securities and certificates of deposit, often at a poor rate of return. House Bill 75 would allow them to pursue more aggressive investment through mutual, closed-end and exchange-traded funds and through high-quality corporate bonds — all within certain limits and under the guidance of a professional investment adviser.

  • State declares flu outbreak an epidemic

    The state Department for Public Health says this season’s influenza activity is now considered an epidemic.
    Health officials are warning that this season’s strain of the flu virus can be extremely serious, even deadly – and not just for those in high-risk categories. In general, children, the elderly, extremely obese people, and those with chronic health conditions or weak immune systems are considered at higher risk of getting the flu.

  • State declares flu outbreak an epidemic

    The state Department for Public Health says this season’s influenza activity is now considered an epidemic.
    Health officials are warning that this season’s strain of the flu virus can be extremely serious, even deadly – and not just for those in high-risk categories. In general, children, the elderly, extremely obese people, and those with chronic health conditions or weak immune systems are considered at higher risk of getting the flu.

  • 4-H Camp recruiting staff

    Being a member of summer camp staff is a great opportunity for young people to grow their leadership skills and challenge themselves. The 4-H Camping Program is recruiting staff members for this year.

  • What's Happening

    Habitat for Humanity Valentine’s
    Dinner and Silent Auction

    The Spencer County Habitat for Humanity will hold a Valentine’s Dinner and Silent Auction on Saturday, February 10 at the Spencer County Extension Office beginning at 6:30 p.m.
    Tickets are $12 and are available at The Tea Cup and The Red Scooter or by calling Steve Hesselbrock.
    Habitat for Humanity is now accepting items for the silent auction. To donate or for more information, contact Steve Hesselbrock at 507-3940.