.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • SCHS’s Haun set to retire at end of year

     

  • Spencer among healthiest counties in Kentucky

     

  • Man indicted for lying that he was FBI agent

    A Lexington man charged with impersonating an F.B.I. agent and a Lexington Metro police officer was indicted by a Spencer County Grand Jury on those and other charges earlier this month.
    Robert Anthony Powell, 38, was pulled over after he was witnessed traveling at a high rate of speed on KY 155. Spencer County Deputy John Miller clocked him on a radar reaching speeds of 111 miles per hour and pursued  him into Taylorsville. The driver continued to speed in a congested area with pedestrians, but later pulled over in the McDonald’s parking lot.

  • New fee proposed for dispatch funding

    The Spencer County phone directory continues to get smaller, even while the county’s population gets bigger. That’s the result of the national trend of fewer and fewer homeowners utilizing a landline phone.
    That may seem inconsequential, but the county funds much of its emergency communications from a fee imposed on landlines. That decrease in home phones has resulted in a decrease in that funding by $40,000 and Judge-Executive John Riley says it’s time to revisit an alternative many other counties have used to offset those losses.

  • Showing support for schools
  • What's Happening

    Community Easter Services

    The Spencer County Ministerial Association has announced times and locations for the community Easter services.
    The Good Friday service will be held at noon at First Baptist Church in Taylorsville on Friday, March 30, with Pastor Ken Jackson of Elk Creek Baptist Church bringing the message.
    The Easter Sunrise Service will be held on Easter morning, April 1, at 7 a.m. at Plum Creek Baptist Church.
    Circuit Clerk’s Office closing early
    on Good Friday

  • County turns over funds

    The Spencer County Fiscal Court turned over a little more than $16,000 to a nonprofit group, whose mission is to provide care for stray animals, following a vote at Monday night’s meeting. The 3-2 vote came over the objections of Judge Executive John Riley who said the county was holding the funds to ensure they would be used specifically for the building of a new shelter.

  • Don’t attack the teachers

    As we approach the end of the 2018 Regular Session, it’s become crunch time in Frankfort. It is anticipated that the Senate will pass out their version of the budget this week and the differences will then be settled in a Conference Committee between the House and Senate. This week has seen many bills pass both the full House and House Committees, but there has been a clear focus on public safety and the brave Kentuckians who dedicate their lives to protecting us each and every day. Before I report on these bills, there is an important matter that I want to address.

  • Time to turn on the lights

    Fifty years after Major League Baseball began playing night games under bright lights, Chicago’s Wrigley Field slipped the switch and illumuniated their ivy-covered walls for night baseball.
    A lack of funds during WWII, then stubborness, tradition, red tape and other issues delayed night baseball at Wrigley until 1988.
    Some of those same issues plague efforts here locally to get lights for youth baseball at Ray Jewell Park.
    There’s a $39,000 grant available, but it must be matched by local funds, either from local government or private donations.

  • Court ruling enabling pay for kindship care will assist families

    For Kentucky grandparents raising their grandchildren, or other relatives tasked with raising children not their own, the job of parenting these children can be challenging enough. It’s often made even more difficult with the new financial burden it can bring.