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Matter of Opinion

  • A Kentucky tragedy that should never be forgotten

     

  • Life is precious and sacred

    Life is precious. We learn that in various ways and from different people. This week, we’re reminded about the value of life from a Spencer County couple who suffered through a miscarriage and the loss of their preborn daughter.
    Thankfully, the mother will be holding their 6-week old daughter tightly on Mother’s Day, with a greater understanding than many of us may have – that life is indeed precious.

  • A Bluegrass Bucket List

    My wife I just returned from a trip to Arizona where we took in the splendor of the Grand Canyon, among other interesting sites.
    The Grand Canyon is an awe-inspiring site and is probably one of the few things in this world that actually lives up to its hype.
    There’s a lot of diversity in Arizona, from the deserts in the south, to the more appealing (at least to me) northern portion that includes the red rocks of Sedona and the ponderosa pine forests of the canyon area.

  • Who won? Not your average Joe

    Somewhere in Kentucky, there’s a man named Joe struggling to feed his family. He’s been raised to believe in hard work and self-sufficiency, so he works overtime to make ends meet and avoids having to rely on government assistance. Sure, it makes life hard, but it does him proud to be able to look his family in the eye, and himself in the mirror.
    Unfortunately, Kentucky just made it harder on Joe.

  • Less debating, more discussing

    Newspapers, even ones in small towns like Taylorsville, are part of the world of mass communication. Mass communication basically refers to a system in which information is distributed to the masses, whether it’s by print, airwaves, or more recently, over the internet.
    Mass communications can be effective in getting the word out about news and events, but it can also lead to mass confusion, mass misunderstandings and mass manipulation.

  • Time to turn on the lights

    Fifty years after Major League Baseball began playing night games under bright lights, Chicago’s Wrigley Field slipped the switch and illumuniated their ivy-covered walls for night baseball.
    A lack of funds during WWII, then stubborness, tradition, red tape and other issues delayed night baseball at Wrigley until 1988.
    Some of those same issues plague efforts here locally to get lights for youth baseball at Ray Jewell Park.
    There’s a $39,000 grant available, but it must be matched by local funds, either from local government or private donations.

  • No excuses: Secure our schools

    If a homeowner or business owner continued to be burglarized, do you believe he or she would be most concerned about the tools used to gain entry? Would they spend days and weeks pondering the mental mindset of the person breaking in? Would they suggest townhall meetings or new laws to limit access to bolt cutters or new programs to identify and counsel would-be thieves?

  • Who won? Not your average Joe

    Somewhere in Kentucky, there’s a man named Joe struggling to feed his family. He’s been raised to believe in hard work and self-sufficiency, so he works overtime to make ends meet and avoids having to rely on government assistance. Sure, it makes life hard, but it does him proud to be able to look his family in the eye, and himself in the mirror.
    Unfortunately, Kentucky just made it harder on Joe.

  • Tuning out Hollywood

    Hollywood celebrated itself Sunday night. They seemingly gather every other week during this time of year for some type of awards show to pat themselves on the back, lecture the common people about politics and values, and generally flaunt their money and looks for the drooling paparazzi.
    Decades ago, Hollywood made attempts to be classy. No doubt they still cornered the market on good looks and high salaries, but they seemed interested in celebrating good stories and good people.

  • Let’s talk about school

    Should kids be forced to attend school?
    That’s a question raised by a local teacher in a video he posted to YouTube last week.
    The premise alone is controversial, but there were other aspects of Mark Hawkins’ 16 minute, self-recorded comments that raise concerns as well.