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Matter of Opinion

  • Boo Humbug

    Trick-or-Treating wasn’t always a thing. There was a time when Halloween saw much more crime and chaos than chocolate and candy. That seemed to change after WWII and the tradition of visiting neighborhoods seemed to flourish for a few decades.

  • From heroin to heroine

    It takes a lot of courage to talk publicly about your failures. With that in mind, I’m not sure I’ve met many braver individuals than SarahAnn Greewell.
    Sarah’s story of her battle with drug addiction appears on our front page this week. She initially submitted a letter to the editor (published on this page) to thank the first respoonders who helped save her life after an overdose earlier this year. It’s not the kind of letter we get often, so I reached out to her and she was both eager and open to sharing more of her story.

  • Thoughts and prayers matter

    Critics and mockers often laugh and shrug off the ‘thoughts and prayers’ offered up by well-intentioned people in the wake of tragedies.
    Most recently, that’s been the case when mass shootings, like those that take place in schools, leave a nation mourning and asking the repeated questions of “how” and “why?”

  • A heavy emotional toll

    We often see them battling fires, tearing cars apart to reach victims, crawling into unsafe conditions to render first aid, or putting their lives on the line chasing the bad guy. The job of a first responder can be challenging and treacherous, but often overlooked is the emotional toll these jobs can take.
    Last Thursday, some of our own first responders from the Sheriff’s office, fire department and EMS, dealt with a tragedy when a six-year-old boy was killed in a tractor accident.

  • Ignore Twitter storms

    Journalism and baseball are being destroyed by Twitter.
    Click onto many internet news sites, and even tune into an evening cable news network, and it’s suprising how many stories revolve around Twitter messages – and not just the questionable ones that originate from the Oval Office.

  • Out of the dark

    Many of us have held our collective breaths over the past few days as we pray for the 12 boys and their coach who were trapped inside a cave in Thailand for the past several weeks. A risky rescue operation began over the weekend, and as we go to press on Tuesday morning, we’re hearing the wonderful news that all the boys have now been brought out safely. As we celebrate, we contintue to pray for the rescue team that still must emerge, and remember the one Thai Navy Seal who lost his life last week in the rescue effort.

  • Lessons from my dog

    I’m about to make some of you boiling mad. But before I do, let me tell you about a dog I loved.
    When I was a little boy, we had a medium-sized tanned mutt that wandered onto our three acres in Ballardsville and made herself at home. We named her Lassie. Lassie was a good dog. If I was bored, she’d play with me. If I was sad or sulking out on the back porch because Mom had just given me a whippin’, Lassie would sit beside me and look up at me with big brown eyes that seemed to feel my pain.

  • The real Resist movement

    The Resist Movement in America began late on a Tuesday night in November of 2016 when America elected Donald J. Trump as the 45th president. Shocked and awed that Trump had withstood a Hillary campaign that outspent Trump’s by $240 million, along with media-manipulated polls promising a Clinton victory and near constant negative coverage of Trump, Americans on the left of the political spectrum, and some conservatives who buried themselves in Never Trump trenches, immediately began an effort to push back and adopted an existence of denial.

  • Ruling helps protect the integrity of our vote

    Whether you like Donald Trump or hate him, one thing is certain -- one of the most lasting impacts the Trump presidency will have on this nation is the placement of new federal judges, including justices on the U.S. Supreme Court. Early returns show that those conservative judges are restoring common sense and founding principles to America.

  • The free exercise thereof

    Even in the midst of a great moral and spiritual decline, America has always tolerated cultural Christians. A cultural Christian is one who may go to church, will proclaim a belief in and a love for God when asked, and who may be so brazen as to wish you a Merry Christmas come December.