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Today's Opinions

  • Cuts will require thought

    On Tuesday of last week, Governor Matt Bevin presented his budget proposal while addressing the General Assembly in a Joint Session for the annual State of the Commonwealth. Kentuckians, along with members of the House and Senate, Cabinet Secretaries, and Supreme Court Justices, listened intently for what many feared would be one of the trimmest, most austere budgets in recent Kentucky history.

  • Reader takes issue with rendering of Stidger House

    As secretary of the Felix Grundy Stidger Historical Preservation Foundation, Inc., I was appalled at the picture in last week’s edition of The Spencer Magnet depicting what the Stidger House could look like after being refurbished.  
    This was one architect’s idea which was never approved by the board.  I am deeply concerned and disappointed.  This rendering shows no historic value from the exterior and in my opinion looks like a small modern structure. I want the public to know that this depiction in no way meets my approval.
    Bonnie Downs

  • From heroin to heroine

    It takes a lot of courage to talk publicly about your failures. With that in mind, I’m not sure I’ve met many braver individuals than SarahAnn Greewell.
    Sarah’s story of her battle with drug addiction appears on our front page this week. She initially submitted a letter to the editor (published on this page) to thank the first respoonders who helped save her life after an overdose earlier this year. It’s not the kind of letter we get often, so I reached out to her and she was both eager and open to sharing more of her story.

  • Letters to the Editor

    Reader thanks EMS for saving
    her life

    To the Spencer County EMS:
    On February 23, 2018 you responded to a call about my heroin overdose. I was unresponsive and my father was doing CPR. Not only had I relapsed after a year of sobriety, I had lost everything that night.

  • Thoughts and prayers matter

    Critics and mockers often laugh and shrug off the ‘thoughts and prayers’ offered up by well-intentioned people in the wake of tragedies.
    Most recently, that’s been the case when mass shootings, like those that take place in schools, leave a nation mourning and asking the repeated questions of “how” and “why?”

  • Letters to the Editor

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Last week, the Spencer Magnet published a political ad with imagery that many found offensive. The ad was not properly vetted according to our normal procedures. We sincerely apologize.

    Insensitive ad was more than a mistake

  • A heavy emotional toll

    We often see them battling fires, tearing cars apart to reach victims, crawling into unsafe conditions to render first aid, or putting their lives on the line chasing the bad guy. The job of a first responder can be challenging and treacherous, but often overlooked is the emotional toll these jobs can take.
    Last Thursday, some of our own first responders from the Sheriff’s office, fire department and EMS, dealt with a tragedy when a six-year-old boy was killed in a tractor accident.

  • Ignore Twitter storms

    Journalism and baseball are being destroyed by Twitter.
    Click onto many internet news sites, and even tune into an evening cable news network, and it’s suprising how many stories revolve around Twitter messages – and not just the questionable ones that originate from the Oval Office.