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Today's Opinions

  • Who won? Not your average Joe

    Somewhere in Kentucky, there’s a man named Joe struggling to feed his family. He’s been raised to believe in hard work and self-sufficiency, so he works overtime to make ends meet and avoids having to rely on government assistance. Sure, it makes life hard, but it does him proud to be able to look his family in the eye, and himself in the mirror.
    Unfortunately, Kentucky just made it harder on Joe.

  • Who won? Not your average Joe

    Somewhere in Kentucky, there’s a man named Joe struggling to feed his family. He’s been raised to believe in hard work and self-sufficiency, so he works overtime to make ends meet and avoids having to rely on government assistance. Sure, it makes life hard, but it does him proud to be able to look his family in the eye, and himself in the mirror.
    Unfortunately, Kentucky just made it harder on Joe.

  • Letters

    Pension vote was appalling
    Kentucky Retirement Systems stakeholders are shocked and appalled by the actions of the General Assembly regarding public pensions. Last week, in the space of about nine hours, the majority party produced a 291-page pension bill and voted it out of the House and Senate. Senate Bill 151 awaits Gov. Matt Bevin’s signature.

  • Letters to the Editor

    Retired teacher explains her
    anger with pension plan

    Having read your editorial on pension reform for teachers, I felt compelled to respond to some of the statements that were made. When I signed my contract to teach in 1967, retirement benefits were the last thing on my mind. I was just excited to start my teaching career. After teaching for 31 years, I retired. At that time I learned about inviolable contracts, COLAs, defined benefit pensions, etc.

  • Less debating, more discussing

    Newspapers, even ones in small towns like Taylorsville, are part of the world of mass communication. Mass communication basically refers to a system in which information is distributed to the masses, whether it’s by print, airwaves, or more recently, over the internet.
    Mass communications can be effective in getting the word out about news and events, but it can also lead to mass confusion, mass misunderstandings and mass manipulation.

  • Time to turn on the lights

    Fifty years after Major League Baseball began playing night games under bright lights, Chicago’s Wrigley Field slipped the switch and illumuniated their ivy-covered walls for night baseball.
    A lack of funds during WWII, then stubborness, tradition, red tape and other issues delayed night baseball at Wrigley until 1988.
    Some of those same issues plague efforts here locally to get lights for youth baseball at Ray Jewell Park.
    There’s a $39,000 grant available, but it must be matched by local funds, either from local government or private donations.

  • Letters to the Editor

    Teachers are protecting pension
    as part of their contract

    Last week, I read your perspective on the pension crisis. I was intrigued by your statement that you “don’t understand why” Governor’s Bevin’s ideas have angered teachers. I want to help by offering the other side of the story. Your editorial stated that many Americans will not be receiving pensions. Unfortunately, that is a sad truth. However, the Kentucky Teacher Retirement System isn’t just a pension–it is the law and a contract the state government made.

  • Supports solar energy

    It hasn’t gotten to the full House yet, but I believe this proposed legislation deserves public attention in case that it does.
    As a voter in the 53rd House district that includes Bullitt and Spencer counties, I urge you to watch the Natural Resources and Energy Committee meeting from March 5 on KET regarding solar energy production.