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Opinion

  • As we go to press, a powerful hurricane is bearing down on the southeast coast. We’ve all been following the slow track of Dorian as the storm has been inching it’ way toward the mainland, gaining strength and leaving forecasters befuddled as to where it might make landfall.
    Hurricanes are both terrible and fascinating. They can bring so much death and destruction to large portions of a state or region. This particular storm is forecast to hover the edge of the Atlantic coast, perhaps all the way up to Virginia or beyond.

  • As U.S. Representative Brett Guthrie stood inside a metal building on the farm of Eric and Karen Sweazy Monday, he noticed the smiles that increased with the sound of the steady rain falling on the roof. After fears switched from too much rain in the spring, to not enough rain in mid-summer, the showers brought some relief to those whose livelihood is often dependent upon the weather.

  • The Kentucky State Fair kicks off later this week and it’s a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the Commonwealth.
    Famed Kentucky author Jesse Stuart spoke with great love for his native state, and often talked about the many diverse regions of Kentucky. From the mountains of Eastern Kentucky, the Knobs region of south central Kentucky, and the Western Kentucky coalfields, along with others, Stuart recognized the diversity of culture within this state.

  • One of the most somber places any American can visit is Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Thousands and thousands of our bravest are laid to rest there as a testament that the freedom we celebrated last week did not come without a heavy cost.
    One of the most sacred sites in the cemetery, is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which is patroled by uniformed soldiers around the clock, through all kinds of weather. That concern is symbolic that our nation will always respect, cherish and honor the lives sacrificed for our behalf.

  • The tragic death of a Shelby County man who was killed when he was swept away in swollen floodwaters as he attempted to cross a wash over bridge last week, is a reminder of just how fragile life can be and how one decision can change everything.

  • Yes, we just endured another pretty mild winter, but the cold always seems to feel colder in February and March when we long for warmer weather, sunny skies and getting outdoors.
    Spring is here and it’s always amazing at how quickly Kentucky turns green. If you pay attention, there are more leaves unfurled on your drive home than you noticed on your drive into work this morning. The change is rapid and the change is welcome!

  • The Spencer County Fiscal Court concluded last week that they are willing to suffer through a year of pain before rushing to raise insurance premium taxes on property owners.

  • Flipping the calendar over to a brand new year brings new opportunities and fresh beginnings. It’s the time of year when many people make resolutions and resolve to break old habits or begin new ones.
    This year, new elected officials begin new terms in Spencer County, and there’s a real chance for progress, as long as office holders will keep their focus on the county and not be distracted by petty differences, political spats or personality conflicts. It’s easier said than done, but citizens should demand it.

  • Elected officials often hear criticism, and rarely hear praise. Of course, they sometimes do things taxpayers don’t like, and those who disagree are typically way more vocal than those who agree.
    Still, as a number of elected officials prepare to leave office soon, it’s fitting to at least acknowledge their willingness to do an often thankless job that comes with a big target.

  • The debate in Spencer County is no longer whether we want change or not. Change is happening all around us. We can either try to manage it, or it will manage us.

  • It’s fitting that Thanksgiving ushers in the holiday season. What better way to prepare our hearts for Christmas than to pause, reflect and offer up thanks for all of our own blessings. Being grateful is a prelude to being generous.
    Whether you’ve lived in Spencer County a short while or your entire life, you’ve probably come to recognize that this is a special community that cares for one another. Sure, there are exceptions, but as a community, we look out for each other, we care for each other, and we give like few other places.

  • When you put several hundred middle schoolers inside a crowded gym, you would expect the noise to be deafening. But as a lone trumpeter played taps Friday morning to honor fallen veterans, there was not a peep, shuffle or whisper to be heard at Spencer County Middle School. It’s called respect and it was on full display this weekend at various Veterans Day events across the county.

  • There is a time for everything,
    and a season for every activity under the heavens:
     a time to be born and a time to die,
    a time to plant and a time to uproot,
    a time to kill and a time to heal,
    a time to tear down and a time to build,
    a time to weep and a time to laugh,
    a time to mourn and a time to dance,
    a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
     a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
     a time to search and a time to give up,

  • Tis the season when newspapers across the nation publish political endorsements. Most often, these are decided by newspaper staff members who arrogantly meet around a table and agree that they are better informed and more knowledgable than the average voter. So out of the goodness of their heart and civic minded charity, they share their superior knowledge with the general public in hopes that the election will turn out the way the newspaper prefers.
    So without further ado, here are our endorsements:
     

  • Learning a trade by being an apprentice has been a practice spanning centuries. A young person would be taken under the wing of a skilled craftsman or tradesperson, and learn from the master. It was hands-on training with immediate feedback, correction and encouragement.
    How refreshing that apprenticeships seem to be making a comeback for young people. Spencer County Schools should be applauded for participating in this type of program.

  • “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”
        The First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America

  • It was kind of tough to get around in downtown Taylorsville Saturday night. Main Street was packed with people, and we’re not talking about just the sidewalks. The street itself was shut down, blocked by a huge stage where Spencer County native JD Shelburne returned home to launch a new CD.
    It’s nice to see events that bring people together, especially in the heart of a community. Folks came with lawn chairs, lined them up in a mostly orderly fashion and one couldn’t help but notice that just about everyone had a smile on their face.

  • By the time you finish reading this sentence, it will be history. History is like that – it happens just as quickly as the present becomes the past.
    History is an important indicator of where we’ve been, where we are, and where we are going. That’s why it’s vital that we study history, preserve history and appreciate history. But we must resist the temptation to get stuck in history.

  • People who enjoy a good, productive garden, must invest a considerable amount of time and energy weeding out the bad and keeping the good. Left unattended, weeds can quickly overtake a garden in little time, not only hiding the good stuff, but choking it off and robbing it of nourishment as well.
    To the careless or inexperienced gardener, it may be hard to tell the difference between weeds and crops. They’re all green, they grow in the dirt and it takes training and effort to discern the two.

  • People who enjoy a good, productive garden, must invest a considerable amount of time and energy weeding out the bad and keeping the good. Left unattended, weeds can quickly overtake a garden in little time, not only hiding the good stuff, but choking it off and robbing it of nourishment as well.
    To the careless or inexperienced gardener, it may be hard to tell the difference between weeds and crops. They’re all green, they grow in the dirt and it takes training and effort to discern the two.