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Opinion

  • Spencer County Fiscal Court got a dressing down Monday from a man who will soon take  his seat at the court’s table. Jim Travis, who won May’s primary for magistrate in Elk Creek, requested permission to address the court and offered up a civil, but biting critique of the disfunction of county government over the past four years.

  • Spencer County Fiscal Court got a dressing down Monday from a man who will soon take  his seat at the court’s table. Jim Travis, who won May’s primary for magistrate in Elk Creek, requested permission to address the court and offered up a civil, but biting critique of the disfunction of county government over the past four years.

  • Congratulations to the Class of 2018. Whether you graduated from Spencer County High School, Hillview Academy, or received a degree from college or a certification from a technical school, this is a pivotal moment in your life.
    You deserve to take a breath, reflect on your accomplishments and pause to thank those who helped you along the way. But make it brief. Life is waiting for you and you can’t afford to rest on your laurels.
    Opportunity awaits and the choices you make over the next few years will go a long way in determining the rest of your life.

  • A pot-hole filled parking lot at a hotel might be a nuisance, but a crumbling driveway at your house might spur you to action. It’s amazing what we might be willing to put up with when we distance ourselves from ownership.
    Sadly, for many people who now call Spencer County home, they don’t always treat it like home. These are residents who simply spend the night here, but whose jobs, commerce, and other activities take place across the Jefferson County line.

  • There’s a lot of great lessons to be learned on the baseball diamond. Young people learn how to function as a team, individual responsibility, the value of hard work and how to focus when they’re out in the field for several innings.
    When a kid steps up to the plate, he or she learns the importance of patience, observance and the value of repetition. They learn that sometimes their job isn’t to hit the ball and pad their own batting average, but to sacrifice that average in order to move the runner ahead of them around the bases.

  • It’s so fitting that in Kentucky, elections, whether they be May primaries or November general elections, typically fall on or near the same week Americans celebrate veterans. In November, it’s Veterans Day and in May, it’s Memorial Day.
    Few things are more American than the freedom to vote, and that freedom has been purchased with the sacrifice of the blood of tens of thousands of Kentuckians who have laid down their lives in the defense of our liberties since before Kentucky gained statehood in 1792.

  • Some people hate dandelions. They even spray their yard for them and do everything possible to keep the weeds with the bright yellow blooms from overtaking their yard. While many consider them a nuisance and unsightly, they do serve as a refreshing symbol that spring has sprung and after a long, cold winter, it’s nice to be reminded of that.
    It’s the same way with political yard signs. They are often unsightly, sometimes seem uncontrollable and they start to appear about the same time as the dandelions, and are usually less appealing.

  • When I was 17-years-old, I crossed the stage in the gym of my high school, received my diploma, and then walked into my future. At that point, I had decisions to make that would impact the rest of my life. Among the most important – what was I going to do for the next 40-50 years.

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  • Mrs. “Sissy” Myrtle F. Goodpaster, age 80, of Cox’s Creek, returned to her Heavenly Father on February 11, 2018. Mrs. Goodpaster was born in Nelson County on July 1, 1937 to the late Hubert and Mildred Breeden.
    Among those who preceded her in death include her husband, Leonard E. Goodpaster, Sr.; son, Russ Lee Goodpaster; sister, Carolyn Trent; and brothers, Junior Breeden and Ivo Mudd.

  • A small community in Western Kentucky said goodbye to two 15-year-old high school students on Sunday, less than a week after they were shot and killed, allegedly by a fellow student at Marshall County High School.
    The news of the school shooting shook not only that community, but small towns all across Kentucky. Even though the bullets that killed two and injured more than a dozen others were fired more than three hours away, the reality ricocheted here locally as minds immediately began wondering, “Could that happen here?”

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  • On Tuesday of last week, Governor Matt Bevin presented his budget proposal while addressing the General Assembly in a Joint Session for the annual State of the Commonwealth. Kentuckians, along with members of the House and Senate, Cabinet Secretaries, and Supreme Court Justices, listened intently for what many feared would be one of the trimmest, most austere budgets in recent Kentucky history.

  • Governor Matt Bevin knew he was going to draw the ire of many last week when he presented a budget that called for many local school districts to tap into their reserves. He knew he would make many upset when he called for the elimination of 70 programs. And he knew he would not be making a lot of friends with a call for a 6.25 across the board cut in state spending.

  • After reading John Shindlebower’s column, I feel inspired! I have seen the light and have some suggestions for our Republican brethren. Let’s start charging admission to our new Public Library! This is a can’t-miss solution, not only on a local level, but statewide!

  • While the discussion in Frankfort lately is about pension reform, many believe the far more serious problem is the unfunded liability in each pension plan.

  • Every summer, Americans celebrate Independence Day and amidst all the picnics, ballgames and fireworks, some of us still try to honor the spirit of rugged individualism that America was built on.

    Here in Kentucky, many of us trace our roots back to hearty pioneers who followed the path through the Cumberland Gap, or who floated down the Ohio River on flatboats to settle this wild and beautiful land.

  • Former House Speaker Jody Richards recently joined the growing chorus of longtime Democratic legislators announcing they would not seek re-election this year.

    Richards, D-Bowling Green, who went to Frankfort the year Jimmy Carter was elected president, pounded the gavel in the House for 14 years, making him the longest-serving Speaker in Kentucky’s history.

  • The General Assembly is back in regular session as of January 2 and it looks to be another productive, busy time as over one hundred bills have already been filed, pension reform looms, and a $22 billion budget and road plan must be formulated, debated and passed into law.

    This session is twice as long as last year – 60 days, with our last day being April 15 – in order to craft a budget as well as typical legislation.

  • Tuesday was National Law Enforcement Officers Appreciation Day. It’s not a recognized national holiday or widely recognized by the general public, but it seems fitting that those men and women whose goal is to ‘serve and protect’ are worthy of a tip of hat or a pat on the back.

    We live in an age where there’s a lot of anger and suspicion directed at police officers. Some of it is warranted, but most of it is not.